Dr Sean Paul – What’s an Oculoplastic Surgeon

Trish

Hello, listeners. It’s Trish Hammond here from the Transforming Bodies podcast and today I’m speaking with Dr Sean Paul. He’s based all over the other side of the world in Austin, Texas and he’s an Oculoplastic Surgeon and today we’re gonna talk about first of all, what it is, what he does, and why he does the treatment he does. So welcome Dr Paul. 

 

Dr Paul

Hey, Trish. Thanks for having me.

 

Trish

Thanks so much for joining us. I  met you at the recent Rockstar event as actually Rockstar has said better to get that right. Hey. Otherwise, they’ll think we’re in a heavy metal band or something. But it’s on Rockstar Aesthetics in Brisbane, Australia, I listened to your talk, and I was blown away. So I’m really excited to have you on this podcast, so I really, really appreciate it. But tell us but first of all, like, what is an oculoplastic surgeon? How did you get started?

 

Dr Paul

Yeah. Thanks for having me. Yeah. So I’ll kind of be happy to talk about what an oculoplastic surgeon is and I think this is a really good question because even I hadn’t heard of Oculoplastics where a surgeon was until I went through my medical training but kinda to break it down, there’s multiple pathways into plastic surgery or aesthetic surgery and my pathway was through the eyes and so as I went through our medical school training, I was very interested in plastic surgery. I was also interested in ophthalmology. I was very fortunate to do some of my medical school training at a military hospital in Texas and I was able to learn from patients who had severe burns on their eyes and their faces and I was able to learn how we could rehabilitate their vision by improving the surface of the underside of their eyelids as well as the burns on their face and so that really got me interested in the holistic and functional approach of treating the vision of my patients, but also the aesthetic components of that as well and so oculoplastic surgery, essentially, you go to medical school resident you go to medical school, then you follow-up with a residency in ophthalmology, and then you do a two-year fellowship, that’s two committed years to eyelid orbital and facial surgery so everything around the eyes and all the way across the face as well as the deeper structures behind the eye.

 

Trish

Okay, so when would like, are you talking, like, any like, I know this sounds like a really bad question, but, like, to do with inside the eye or on the out, those like because obviously, you do aesthetic procedures as well. So is it both?

 

Dr Paul

Yeah. So it’s kind of both. So we actually don’t typically do, but some we’re typically not working inside the eyeball, like a cataract surgeon or a glaucoma surgeon. Instead, we work on the tissues around the eyes, so that would be fatty tissue that can make the eyes look bulky or broken bones around the eye those are areas that we really focus on during our functional academic training, and then we spend a lot of our time focusing on the aesthetics and pictures of eyelid, brows, and cheek, and that’s where I spend most of my time currently.

 

Trish

Okay and so if someone was to want a facelift? Is that something that you would do?

 

Dr Paul

So we’re trained to do facelifts. I would still say that most oculoplastic surgeons focus on aesthetic and functional procedures from the brow down to the cheek and so I kind of leave those bigger procedures to my colleagues who’ve done face a facial plastic fellowship or general plastics fellowship and I think that’s just because I really like being a super-specialist around the eyes.

 

Trish

Yep and one of the things I love is the fact that you actually use nonsurgical, you do nonsurgical treatments and procedures as well because obviously that’s what people are looking for as well. How do you combine that because you’ve got a massive clinic there in Austin, from what I can see online, haven’t you?

 

Dr Paul

Yeah, I mean, I think that what we found in the last ten to fifteen years is that patients are seeking non-filler, non-toxin, more energy-based devices to contour tissue. I think that like with any new treatment that’s out in the market, we really focus on safety and efficacy. We also focus on enhancing our surgical results by using energy so whether it’s laser treatments or RF treatments or ultrasound treatments we have a lot of different options for our patients and a lot of times, patients just aren’t ready to go through the surgical downtime and really may not even need a search for results so our job is to help really focus on the skin. I think that all those different modalities do a great job of that.

 

Trish

That’s so true and people can kinda walk away with getting the big things done and the small things done if that kind of makes sense.

 

Dr Paul

Yeah, absolutely. And so you can do the most beautiful blepharoplasty, or eyelid lift surgery, or lower eye bag surgery in the world but if the skin doesn’t look very good, you’ve really done a disservice and so I really try to focus on a really natural approach. A lot of time that involves minimally invasive and if we talk about what, like, the definition of minimally invasive means there’s no excisional surgery. Nothing’s being cut out and so if you’re using lasers, you’re really resurfacing the top layer of the skin. If you’re using a radio frequency or ultrasound, you’re going to some of the deeper tissues and there are some other devices that go even deeper and I think that’s really nice to have that option to either enhance your surgical results or give patients a non-surgical option if they’re an appropriate candidate.

 

Trish

Okay and so part of the procedures that you do, so you do, like, an upper bleph lift and a lower bleph lift because over here in Australia, like I believe, a GP can do a bleph. Well, that’s how it used to be anyway but why would someone like, I’m gonna make sense to me? But why would someone who wants to have an upper and lower bleph they would go to someone who’s got that aesthetic kind of eye as well as functional, of course so can you tell us a little bit about that? Like, why you would like, why would I choose to go to an oculoplastic surgeon to get my upper and lower bleph? Over and above going to someone who says a GP that does blepharoplasty. 

 

Dr Paul

Yeah. I mean, that’s a really good question. You know, I’m a consumer just as many of the listeners are and as you are as well and I think that we all agree that expertise is invaluable. You want someone who is very familiar with the anatomy and variations of the anatomy of one specific area. We value expertise, but we value quality. We value consistency, and I think it’s so, so, so important to understand that I’ve spent my life devoted to eyelids and not only my medical training, but the first ten years of my career, this is all I’ve been doing and so when you do a lot of one thing I think it just pays dividends for the patient to go with someone who’s a niche, niche doctors, someone who’s really an expert in one area. I think that’s what I make my primary libby doing is eyelid surgery and so I always put my put myself in the shoes of the person across from me and I think the number one and number two questions I get as a surgeon are, how many of these procedures have you done? And secondly, they’ll basically wanna see pictures before and after so those are key questions to ask any surgeon or any expert. If you’re going for legal advice, you wanna go to someone who’s an expert in a certain thing, whether it’s a contract or whether it’s I don’t know, real estate law, whatever you’re interested in, you want to go to dashboard and I firmly believe not only a GP, but a general plastics or even a facial plastics, they all would probably agree they could all do a good job doing it, but it may not be the first thing that’s on their mind. The first thing on my mind in the last my mind is eyelids, and that’s it’s just because I love it. I’m also passionate about it and I’ve seen a lot of different anatomy. I can clearly run off all the risk benefits and alternatives to surgery and I think it’s just it takes time. It doesn’t happen overnight. It just takes a lot of time and focus on being an expert.

 

Trish

Yeah. Cool. I totally agree. I’m all about the like, I know that a lot of surgeons can do a lot of things, but I think everybody kind of specializes in they’re passionate about one particular procedure or a couple of different procedures, and that’s what, like, actually, like really really good at as well. I totally agree with what you’re saying so tell me, so the upper lid and the lower lid, because I know that the lower lid is something completely different hey so if someone was having a lower bleph lift, like, is the recovery time different? Is it a much bigger deal of the read my mouth and this is words because my husband himself is like, oh, come on. I’ve got oh, he’s got those fatty pads under the eyes that kind of really I mean, he hates them and he’s not into aesthetic stuff as well, but he’s actually seriously considering getting it done.

 

Dr Paul

Yeah. I think facial surgery is different than other parts of the body because we all feel the pressure if you’re having anything on your face. I mean, if you and I have a little pimple on her face, we feel frustrated. Right? Because it’s just right for everyone to see and then I need it so I think I equate it to functional downtime, which is can I do my day-to-day activity or my eye is gonna be too swollen that’s one part of it. I think the second part of it is aesthetic downtime when it comes to, whether am I gonna be able to go out to dinner parties or go meet friends and not feel super awkward. Traditionally, with upper eyelid surgery, there’s gonna be an incision about six to ten millimeters above the eyelashes. It’s typically hidden very well so that surgery hides nicely and also the swelling in that area typically lasts about three to five days and so by about a week to ten days, you’re feeling pretty good. You’re just gonna be puffy and have some small visible lines of surgery that typically fade away over the next few months and you can cover up with makeup at two weeks, which is helpful for anyone, or even a ton of tinted sunscreen as well so that’s the upper area. When you talk about the lower lids, the anatomy is different. There’s also a difference in the way the lymphatic strain in that area and in general, people just tend to swell in the lower eyelids in the middle of the face just because of the way the anatomy sits and so we really make a focus for our patients to be prepared for that, and the swelling can take a little bit longer but still, in general, you’re looking at about two weeks of total social downtime, and it can vary. If some patients are bruised and some are not bruised, as we all know, if we’ve had cosmetic sir, have gotten into a scuffle, some of us bruised badly and some don’t, and also depends on what kind of medications you’re on and other things like that so I typically felt patients about 10 to 14 days of downtime and then as long as you’re comfortable going back into work or wherever else, you should be totally fine.
What’s been really nice is somebody might my patients or remote workers via Zoom or other things now where they just turned their camera off starting you know, I would rather definitely recommend 4 to 5 days of taking it easy just because we want you to cover as quickly as possible and then after that, they may be with the camera off for a little bit or not seeing clients for another week, and then they’re back to their routine so there’s really no perfect time to do the surgery. It’s just a matter of if you’re a correct surgical candidate and that’s what we really pride ourselves on our practices are super special in our group and for me being the eyelid guy, I like that I can coach my patients through that process.

 

Trish

Yep and it’s really quite mind-blowing to me, it’s really quite mind-blowing the difference in someone because I’ve, of course, stalked your website, but then the difference of someone who’s had the like, the lower eye surgery like those results are astounding like, there’s no doubt about it.

 

Dr Paul

And what’s so crazy about all our lower lids patients is I have patients to say, oh, they just popped up in the last year, and then they go back and look at photos and the big thing about lower eyelid fat pads or swelling is just most of the time genetic and what’s really nice if the surgery is done correctly is the results come last of a very long time, 10, 20, 30 years so their investment for a procedure for a very specific thing that bothers them is just really high. They’re not having to come for repeat treatments, they’re not having to come for secondary surgery. If they lose a ton of weight, they might have some show the fullness but overall, they’re really happy. So that’s, again, maybe I’m just selfish as a surgeon. I like doing things that make my patients happy and I feel like lower lid surgery and upper lid patients make my patients very happy. I’ve done enough surgery and seen enough surgery from other people where I know the things I do want to do and things I want to avoid, and so I can educate them and I would say 9 times out of 10, the patient and I are good fit, and then one time out of ten is not and I just tell them, hey, there’s a lot of good surgeons out there. I just really recommend you go to a special that’s gonna help you the best.

 

Trish

That’s true because you do gotta have that connection with your patient and vice versa as well, you have to have that connection that you’re gonna help them to achieve the as a practitioner, I guess you have to know that you’re gonna help them to achieve the results they want and that’s a patient. I guess you have to find that surgeon that resonates with what you want and kind of like because I’ve gone and booked him for surgery and said, I want this, and the and the doctor said to me, no like, I had a nose job and I said, like, I want that little Aussie upturned nose and is like an I’m not gonna do that for you because you’ve got a Roman nose. You’re obviously of that sort of background, but I will make your nose a better shape and get rid of that bump on top and I’m so glad he did because I’ve seen people that have actually gone in and obviously said, I want this and they’ve got exactly what they are for, but it wasn’t right for their face they have to look at the whole person. Hey.

 

Dr Paul 

Yeah. I mean, you have to look at the whole person. I’ll tell you, like, the personality fit is so critical like, you this is someone that’s gonna be, you’re gonna be going through the post-operative period, you’re gonna get to know them for the next three to six months to twelve months and it’s just like if you’re looking for a business partner or you’re dating or something if it’s just not the right fit, it’s okay and the thing is you’ve picked choices, the surgeons have choices too and sometimes if you don’t see eye to eye on, me being able to meet your expectations, then it’s okay to get a second opinion that’s totally reasonable and I think there are so many people that can benefit from these procedures and I think as even as a patient myself, I mean, I would wanna go to someone who just does a lot of one thing that’s very niche, and I think that’s what makes sense to me and I wouldn’t wanna go to a jack of all trades that does a little bit of everything. Yeah, that kind of personality.

 

Trish

Yep. Yep. That’s exactly how I feel as well. So I was gonna ask you, do you do things like brow lifts and stuff like that? Because that’s all kind of, like, up that same area, or is that something or you’d do specifically eyes?

Dr Paul 

Those of brows are the most underdone surgery around the eyes because if you really come in let’s say you have three people come in that say they have droopy eyelids, 2.5 out of 3of those people are gonna have a droopy brow at the same time and so they’re gonna think that they have extra skin or their eyelashes are too low, but a lot of times it’s the brow and a lot of times, you’ll the telltale signs of someone having brow toasters or heaviness to the brow is they’re using their forehead to lift it up so they hate when they get toxin injected in their forehead because it feels too heavy. That’s one. Two, they’ll have wrinkles on their forehead that are really over-accentuated because they’re trying to lift everything away and the other thing that you’ll notice as well with these patients is they’ll grab the tissue right around the brow and say they have heavy eyelids when in fact it’s the brow that’s falling and the reason the brows falling is just there’s a laxity in the center of the fat that’s behind the brow and there’s also a laxative, the skin tissue and a laxative, the muscle, the kind of everything deeper to the brow, all the way down to the bone that causes that forehead to be heavier so I do a ton of brow surgery and conjunction with upper eyelid surgery. It’s very, very rare. I do eyelid surgery by itself although for all, for basic nomenclature standpoint, yeah, that’s all kinda called upper blepharoplasty or upper lid lift, there is a little bit of fear with patients of an overdone look or a surprising look with the forehead lift or brow lift and so my preferred technique is more of a minimally invasive approach through the incisions in the brow as opposed to going into the forehead line, which is a little bit different, but at least my patients with less scarring. I think they get a strong result that doesn’t look overdone and if you go to my website at austinfaceandbody.com, you’ll see a ton of my patients who have that and the last thing you wanna do is force the tissue in a weird direction to look overdone and you have to really show before and after pictures of patients to help them understand why it’s important because the worst thing you can do is take out too much eyelid skin underneath the brow, and the patients have problems with closing their eye, and that’s a big cure of patients and so we just really don’t wanna do that and I think that’s why it’s so important to know your brow anatomy, forehead anatomy, and your eyelid anatomy as much as I wanna be a specialist with the eyelids only, I have to know the upper face.

 

Trish

Of course. Of course. And one thing, I noticed that you do Broadband light or BBL and, like, under the, like, the people that like, under the eyes, is that right? Because just a thought of that freaks me out, but I’ve seen the results, and it’s actually quite mind-blowing, and it looks like it doesn’t even hurt anyway.

 

Dr Paul 

Yeah. So there has been a lot of research done on the use of intense pulse light or BBL is one of the brand names that decreases rosacea around the eyelids in their specific condition called ocular rosacea. There’s also inflammation that can cause dry eyes by the glands being too clogged and IPL is used to treat that area, so that is definitely a treatment we use as an adjunct for patients who wanna come in just for that treatment alone or as a treatment in conjunction with the with surgical procedures we’re doing so this is a non-surgical approach to improve the dryness on the eyes without using drops which is really nice.

 

Trish

And it does it kind of like, is it useful? Does it make you a bit more useful? Did it mean, like what does it actually do?

 

Dr Paul 

So it actually decreases inflammation in your eyes, just function back so the usefulness

 

Trish

It gets rid of the puffy. Oh, sorry. Sorry. It gets rid of the puffy.

 

Dr Paul 

It’s more that the oil glands on the eyelid that put oil onto your eye are clogged up and so if you use the BBL or the IPL to decrease the inflammation, their eyes feel better. That’s the functional benefit. There’s no benefit on the wrinkle side, and that’s typically why we add laser resurfacing at the same time. Now you can do that entire treatment of the IPL or the BBL, not only around the eyes, but on the nose and the cheeks, and that can help with the rosacea changes or the redness changes and we typically have patients come in 3 to 4times a year for maintenance with that, there’s a functional benefit, their eyes feel better, the tears are better in the eye, their eyes don’t look as red, those are major benefits and we also get those patients many times off of eye drops as well so there’s a major functional benefit, and many times our patients just they’re getting that treatment done, want to also treat the rest of the face because they’re gonna obviously have potentially other browns, reds, ageing signs on the face and they’ll get the full face or even neck done or other areas as well because typically we’ll do eyes, face, neck, and even arms and chest and decolletage things like that but what’s remarkable is that there’s no downtime. I mean, you have to be out of the sun a little bit before and a little bit afterward, but there’s no visible sign of a procedure being done, which our patients really appreciate.

 

Trish

Oh, totally, and I was gonna ask you about it because I noted that you do tear trough fillers. Is that something that you do yourself? Or would someone else in the clinic do that?

 

Dr Paul 

So tear trough filler is really interesting. It was very popular in the 2010s and then even as late as last year and then what we’re seeing now is we’re seeing the different fillers are all just lasting a little bit longer than advertised and so I tend to actually see the opposite problem.
I see too much filler placed into the teardrop so I’m having to dissolve so much filler these days. It’s completely changed loyalty practice aesthetics. Austin, Texas is very similar to London or to Beverly Hills or New York, and we have a lot of patients who are getting treatments like that done, and so we’re seeing a different issue. Now tear trough filler, if done appropriately in small areas, I think, can look amazing. The risk for the patient is that it looks too puffy or if they weren’t the right candidate to get it done. In our practice, all the surgeons do the injections themselves, and state by state in the United States, their different rules on who can do the injections but in our practice, yes, I do my own injections.

 

Trish

Yeah, right, and I’d never heard of this before, but that’s before I looked at your website but what because I noticed that you do canthoplasty and it’s actually something I believe that you’re like, that you’re you’re passionate about as well. First of all, am I right? And number two, like, what is canthoplasty? So someone’s got really really small eyes and wants them to look larger and and bigger. Can you tell us a bit about that? Because I didn’t even know that this was possible, to be honest.

 

Dr Paul 

So it’s another hot topic because Canthoplasty and Canthopexy are two different add junks that can be added into lower eyelid surgery if you’re doing a lower lid blepharoplasty, which is removing or improving the bag appearance of bags underneath the eye depending on the anatomy, you may want to tighten the outside corner of the eye. Now, I am a huge proponent of do not disturb the canthus. The canthus is technically where the upper lid and the lower lid meet out toward the corner on the outside of the eye that’s called the lateral canthus. There’s another canthus third corner of our eye, some patients, and we know these are very trending procedures because they wanna change the appearance of their eye, they want that entire canvas, basically, the entire thing lifted and moved up, and that’s the “Fox Eye” and there’s another animal nomenclature out there that are popular right now so that’s more of a true aesthetic change in appearance. A traditional Canthopexy or Canthoplasty is when you’re going to tighten the ligament that’s keeping the lower lid in place back to the corner and it’s just basically the surgeon’s choice after discussion with the patient on where they want it to sit. Most patients don’t want it moved they just want the lid tighter, so the lid doesn’t basically migrate down toward the cheek, which makes a lot of sense. You don’t wanna have aesthetic surgery done, and the lid’s not tightened. Many of my younger patients don’t need it touched at all. They don’t need to move that canthus whatsoever because their lids are youthful and there’s a lot of good spring to the canthus already, so they don’t need to change that at all. An aesthetic canthoplasty, if you look at pictures of Kylie Jenner, if you look at others, like Ariana Grande, you’re gonna see the way their eyes slow so there are different tilts. There’s a positive tilt. There’s a negative tilt. If you look at Marilyn Monroe’s picture, she actually sat a little bit lower on the canthus and that was really great looking then there are younger other people like Ariana Grande who have kind of an upper tilt so it really depends on your aesthetic. What’s wild is that you have if you have patients pulling what their goal is. It’s really nice to have the picture space if they are with their patients and their desired result, with the patients’ picture and the desired results picture up next to each other and you’ll realize that patients may not necessarily understand what that means, and you don’t wanna make deforming change to a patient without that healthy discussion. Again, as I’d mentioned starting, the canthus is such an important area anatomically to keep the eye in a good position, to help close the eye. It’s something I really take the heart of, and we do that procedure many times as a combined procedure if needed with lower lid surgery. It’s just those younger patients who are designed to have different looks, it just takes a lot more of a great patient-doctor relationship before we decide to proceed.

 

Trish

Yeah. Because I understand, I hadn’t realised that there was a name for that area there because when I put my eyeliner on, the eyeliner with the little wings and all that. As you get older, it kind of drops a bit there. So that’s obviously the little area that talking about, like, just that lateral I totally get it now so now I know that’s called a Canthus. I’ll remember that from now on. 

 

Dr Paul 

And this is basically the kind of the upper lid and lower lid and many women think that they need a little bit of a tuck or a little bit of a lift out there because they don’t like the way that skin is sagging. It’s my job to educate them and that’s why they pay to come to see me so I can give them a good consultation to help them make the best decision on, whether will surgery fix the issue. Will energy with lasers RF or other treatments fix the issue? Or is there not an alternative? And we have to live with it? Do we focus on skin care and other things? And again, it really depends on age. It’s really important to understand they’ve had surgery or even had trauma before those play a lot of factors into that decision-making process most Importantly, is this something that’s trending that may look good now, but they may not like afterward? And then what damage can you cause? If you move something out of position, and it’s anatomically not in the right position can you give a functional problem? That those are those are important things to address.

 

Trish

Yeah. Of course. And it’s so funny because I’ve often wanted what because Kylie does look very different to her old photos, and I didn’t kind of get how she’d changed so much around that area and so that obviously makes so much sense now. So the little lid has just been lifted up a bit. Okay. Got it.

 

Dr Paul

I’m not their surgeon. I haven’t studied their pictures extensively. I just know those are pictures that are shown to me by my patients and again, go look at Marilyn Monroe’s pictures, and we can all agree. She looked a certain way and of course, there were rumors that she had other surgeries around her face and you’ll wanna kinda look at, like, where the outside corner fits. During our medical oculoplastics training, we’re trained to raise it up about a millimeter or two higher than the outside corner or resolve to the middle of the eye. Keep a little bit of an upturn, but people genetically sometimes have lower-set eyes or downturn eyes, and they do not look terrible. It’s just you wanna make sure that facial shape matches. You don’t want an upturned eye that looks way overdone or anatomically can cross problems in these patients.

 

Trish

Yep. Yep. Totally. I’m sorry. I could talk to you all day, but I’ll bring this up I wanted to ask you, in America, it’s slightly different to what or very different actually to what is in Australia so you can actually do a lot of these procedures in the clinic under local anaesthesia. Is that right?

 

Dr Paul

Yep. So upper lid surgery, and some brow surgeries, are very commonly done under local anaesthesia, maybe slight sedation, oral sedation, but usually under local anaesthesia in the right candidates and I think that’s again another important discussion. So as a patient, you want to feel a certain way of a certain experience when you’re having a procedure done.
There are obviously costs outside the surgeon’s fee, whether it’s using a surgery centre or a clinic or whatever it may be medication costs, nurse nursing costs, all those things start to kind of pop and so I think the more and more I’ve gone through things with them. I think the best patient experience isn’t always local anaesthesia only. I think you might wanna make sure they feel like, they can get relaxed during their procedure. We never want a stressful procedure for the patient at all and while it may be easy to do the procedure under local anaesthesia. I think sometimes patient experience is just as important, and I want my patients to feel comfortable so it’s always an offering for our patients if they desire to do it without an IV or they don’t wanna do a joint anaesthesia you typically don’t need joint anesthesia for an upper blepharoplasty alone blepharoplasty is a little bit different.
You definitely would want, like, a deeper IV sedation or general line aesthetic just to get uncomfortable because those tissues underneath the eyes are a lot different. The anatomy is unique and you want the patient to stay still, and you wanna be able to do what you need to do to make sure their lower eyelid down to the cheek looks really nice and filled. Another nice thing about all these procedures is you can add the minimally invasive laser procedures or RF procedures at the same time, and they have the downtime altogether.

 

Trish

Yep. Yep. So if someone was having a lower bleph and the other procedure, would they be out of act? Because I know the upper bleph, you could go back to work straight away. I worked with a girl when she did that, and she just looked like she had mascara on, like she had to come back to work the next day but the lower bleph and say some post op would that be, like, a week out of action? Like, a week so that you could walk out and not look like you’ve had something done?

 

Dr Paul 

Yeah. I would say in general for lower blepharoplasty, the first five days are rough, and then it starts to get better about day six so my patient the back to some sort of work by day seven or eight. I think that’s reasonable and that to really feel like they’ve not had much done, I would say, day fourteen. But the one part with all my patients and any patients out there that have a lower eyelid surgery is bruising and swelling just takes a little bit more time in that area and frictions are back to their routine by two to three weeks at the absolute limits.

 

Trish

Yep. Yep. That’s pretty good. That’s pretty good, it’s wo weeks.

 

Dr Paul

But during our upcoming holiday season, obviously, very busy time because people block these kinds of procedures when they have long weekends or vacation time, and I think that’s a nice way to do it so we stay busy up until about February here in the States, and then we we see a little bit of a quieter time.

 

Trish

Yep. That’s the thing. I’ve got two family members that have to have some surgery, and that’s when they’ve booked it for over the Christmas time, so they can the time off, they can be at home, they’re not gonna be out there so it’s actually a really good time coming up now to have your surgery, I think. Awesome. Awesome. Well, look, I gotta say that’s been so interesting. I could actually seriously talk to you a whole lot longer, but I know that it’s really late there for you. I really appreciate your time so it’s austinfaceandbody.com. If you wanna check out the website, I’ve had so much for me to look at it by the way, I did look at the before and after pictures of Marilyn Monroe and it’s actually quite mind-blowing when you look at it. I would never have known. I just thought it was makeup but now that I was quite oh, wow. She does look kind of different.

 

Dr Paul 

Yeah. And that’s where I wanna mention, like, if she’s a classic beauty, which I think all of us have some level of that, and she was born in 1926 I mean, imagine when it’s gonna be 40 years from now, like, what’s the time and so I think there’s so much beauty within ourselves and we all do not look the same. We all have ethnic mixes that are different or backgrounds are all different and just because something is flashy on social media or flashy in the tabloids, like, it may not be the right choice for you. And also, I think it just teaches our youth to be really prideful about the way they look and feel good, so they don’t have to change their bodies. I think it’s so important to that. 

 

Trish

Yeah. Absolutely, 100%, and even here in Australia, they’ve introduced I guess a questionnaire or like a bit of a body kind of questionnaire that we don’t get people just randomly just I don’t know, just body dysmorphia is a huge thing and I guess, it’s about protecting people. It’s about protecting us from ourselves, really.

 

Dr Paul 

Yeah. I mean, we’re in such a unique position that we can really change the way this person feels the rest of their lives so I just take a lot of thinking very seriously and I have children. I wanna make sure that they are counselors appropriately no matter what the issue and if someone is concerned about something on their face or wherever it is, and they go to a surgeon, like, we just have to take it extremely seriously and so I just love what I do. I love that I can impact someone, and I can talk them out of surgery and I can help them make a decision. I really wanna make sure that they’re choosing the best thing for themselves.

 

Trish 

Exactly. And you know what? Speaking from a personal level, well, I know exactly what you mean because I had been that person who was unhappy with things about myself that I’ve changed slightly or I’ve thought and feel better about now and I’ve got the confidence that I never had when I was younger just because of a couple of little things that although people think, you don’t need anything but if it’s not fine to you like, people can say as much as they want. It’s not about what you think my nose is like. It’s about how I feel about myself and so I’m all about body positivity and if there’s something that’s really causing your anxiety and grief, it’s just amazing that you can achieve the result that you want just by having a procedure done as well so I’m a little bit pro I guess, the one of a better word, it’s your body, your decision.

 

Dr Paul 

Yeah. And I think just if you can whether it’s a younger person, family members are involved in the discussion, it’s really just making sure you’re on the same page and that you guys both have the same goals because many times patients, as you mentioned with body dysmorphia, their hopes and dreams are completely not aligned with reality and so that’s one type of patient and then there’s another patient who’s really spent a lot of time thinking about it and now they are ready to proceed. They’ve obviously thought about it and write about it or seen multiple people and now they’re ready to move forward and they’re pretty decisive and they don’t want to do and they know that it’s either saved up for it or they’re ready to go and or they’re in a good place with work where they can take time off like, they’ve done their homework, and I love those patients because I love helping them.

 

Trish 

Of course. Of course. Oh, look, thank you so much. It’s been so great so guys, if you wanna check out the website, do go and have a look at this. I’m like, I’m just loving the mind-blowing picture I’ll probably be on there for another hour when I get off with you but thank you so much for joining us today.

 

Dr Paul 

Sure and then you can also follow me if you have any questions @drseanpaul on Instagram and like mentioned before by Trish, go to our website. You can always ask us questions or send inquiries. We have patients that are international and all over the United States so we’re always happy to help.

 

Trish

Amazing and what I’ll do is I’ll add a link to the blog post because we usually put it on the Transforming Bodies podcast website as well so I’ll link there as well to people who’ve got it when they have a rage.

 

Dr Paul

Beautiful. Well, thank you so much.

 

Trish

Thanks so much. Have a great day or night you’re in. Thank you so much.

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