Dermal Regenerative Therapy using PRP With Jeannie Devereaux

Dermal Regenerative Therapy using PRP With Jeannie Devereaux

Trish

Hello, listeners. It’s Trish Hammmond here from the Transforming Bodies podcast. And today we’ve got something a little bit different for you. So I am speaking to one of my favourite ladies I’ve met in the industry years ago when I first started, and her name’s Jeanne Devereaux. And today we’re going to be like regenerative medicine is her passion and we’re going to be talking about PRP. So basically, when I say when we talk about PRP, we’re really gonna be talking about Dermal Regenerative Therapy, and all about PRP. So welcome, Jeanne.

Jeannie 

Hello. Thank you for having me, Trish. It is a delight chatting with you. 

Trish 

Yeah, thanks heaps for taking the time because I know how busy you are. So I really appreciate it. I know for a fact because from the time I met you, you’ve always been studying, you’ve been doing your PhD and like, every time I talk to you, you’re always in the throes of really deep studying. So you’ve got a double degree, you’ve got a Bachelor of Health Science or Bachelor of Biomedical Science with honours, and you’re just around the corner from completing your PhD in Medical Biology and Physiology. Is that right?

Jeannie 

Yes, that’s true. Only a few months away now. 

Trish 

Oh, you must be so excited.

Jeannie  

Then I’m going to sleep for six months.

Trish 

I don’t know what to do with yourself when you’re done.

Jeannie 

Yeah, that’s true. That’s true.

Trish 

So you’re actually published in PRP, aren’t you?

Jeannie 

Ah, yes, I published a systematic literature review and then I also studied another study, but the systematic literature review, its main focus was on leukocyte rich, platelet rich plasma and we had a very specific goal that the PRP had to offer a certain dose of platelets. And so it was a systematic review of hundreds of studies, to be honest. And we came up with some remarkable results. And that’s been published for a few years now, and seems to get downloaded a lot. But what we proved in that study was the benefit of high dose platelets and high dose leukocytes in PRP. And what happened from there is I decided to investigate that further. So I performed some experiments and I did a wound experiment, but I also investigated 84 gene expressions of the extracellular matrix. And I investigated that using a very, very high dose leukocyte rich, platelet rich plasma, I dosed the fibroblasts that were ailing fibroblasts, they were sick fibroblasts, low dose, there were 10 billion platelets, right, and then I dosed them, they were also dosed with a high percentage of mononuclear cells. And I watched what happened, and what and I compared that to low dose, what you would just plasma, what you would get actually from a tube and I compared what happened. And the regenerative effects of that 10 billion dose of platelets and the mononuclear cells was astronomically significantly better than if you just used a tube plasma. And it’s quite in depth reading, but it’s a very readable article. And so, yeah, so it’s proven that the higher dose is more beneficial, and not just a little beneficial, it was highly significantly beneficial, so to speak.

Trish 

It’s really funny because it’s like, when you talk, it almost sounds like another language, you know, to the layperson, like me, but so just to bring it back a bit. And also just on that paper, if you don’t mind, I’d love to get a link to it that we could attach to the blog that I do for this and so people could have read it if they want to anyway, if that’s alright with you. 

Jeannie 

Yeah, of course. It’s a public thing. Yeah, that’d be great. 

Trish 

Well, tell me so. So what does therapeutic PRP mean? So PRP is platelet rich plasma. So well, does it mean?

Jeannie 

Well, there’s a difference as you’ve noticed, there’s many brands popping up on the market that call themselves a PRP, this quite, but they are quite distinct from one another. You will notice in one group, they are actually a test tube, or just a blood collecting tube. So they take anything from eight to 10 mils of blood and then there’s another family which are called whole blood cell separators. In Australia, there’s only about maybe four or five that have TGA registration, and that family will retrieve, per seven mil dose of PRP will retrieve at least 10 billion platelets that are injected at the time. Now what that actually means is that they have a concentration of 1.5 million platelets per microliter. In seven mils of PRP, the tubes have a concentration of only about 250,000 platelets per microliter in five mils. So they’re delivering about 1 billion or less to the patient. So basically, you have a dose of 1 billion, and you have a dose of 10 billion and that’s the difference in a tube. And a highly sophisticated whole blood cell separator system. Yeah, so it sounds very complicated. But if you compare it to going to Coles or Woolworths and buying a vitamin A cream off the shelf there, and then you go into a dermal clinicians clinic, and you buy a cosmeceutical. Got it, okay, you have a high dose of vitamin A, or B, three, or C or whatever they are selling compared to what you would get in a shopping centre.

Trish 

Got it. And I guess that’s something that hard for people to understand as well, because people think, well, I get this from the supermarket that’s got vitamin C in it. Whereas opposed to if you did buy that from as a cosmeceutical, it would be the percentage and the quality and the strength would be different.

Jeannie 

Yes. And that’s exactly the same. It’s the same with the PRP industry, it’s not standardised. So a cosmetic in the shopping centre can still say, pro retinol, anti ageing cream. Yep. That’s exactly what is said in the skin clinic as well and the patient or the shopper is none the wiser of the difference until they become educated. And this is educated in that and some are avid readers and they work it out and et cetera. And some people don’t mind their cream from the shopping centre either. So that’s the difference between a tube type and a therapeutic PRP.

Trish 

And, and so does that kind of like is there a difference? Like does that cover what the difference is between? Like, well, actually, what are the differences between the types of PRP that are available? There’s all been the types of PRP availability?

Jeannie 

Yes. Well, in Australia, in what anywhere in the world, there’s those two families, you’ve got your plasma family, and you have your therapeutic PRP family of systems. Is that what you mean? Like? Yep, so the tube systems are allowed to call themselves PRP because we don’t have standardisation in the world yet. There is amongst scientists and there is amongst people in the know. However, they can still call themselves a PRP as the shopping centre can still call their cream pro retinol, anti ageing, moisturiser so that’s the difference. So the whole blood cell separators take a lot more blood and concentrate that and you have a higher concentration and a higher dose, of course. Now, where the confusion is, in the jargon and it’s very difficult for the average person or even the average clinician to wade through all of that information. And sadly the plasma doesn’t give the result as promised, and may not, as probably, in some cases damage the reputation of PRP and like the Vampire Facial, for example. You know that they’ve gone in with a high expectation because patients have expectations similar to fillers and Botox where PRP is something that takes time in the skin. So yeah, there’s a vast difference, it really is the 1 billion versus the 10 billion and at that concentration of 10 billion, you see very significant results. Where the tricky part is for the client is that’s natural regeneration and natural regeneration takes time. And so you see improvement over three to six months, from having your highly rich, those platelets. It’s not something that you wake up, walk out of that clinic and your wrinkle is instantly gone. Yeah, it will go but it goes naturally over time. And the instant gratification has come from fillers, which certainly have their place and the filler has been injected and the wrinkle appears to have gone instantly appears to be gone but the same aged tissue is still there.

Trish  

I get it, and the PRP works on regenerating that tissue so that that wrinkle that is still there with the PRP will go?

Jeannie 

Well, wrinkles are made up of synergid cells, ageing cells, if you want to, if to regenerate properly, you need to remove those cells and then regenerate new cells. How you remove those cells is the monocytes in the PRP so you’re a very highly concentrated leukocyte rich PRP, we’ll do that. Remove what shouldn’t be there and simultaneously replace and regenerate. What should it be there? Got it, that’s different. So the hyaluronic acids clog up the whole will the crevice, but don’t do anything regenerative to the skin and that becomes very obvious every year that we go back to a conference. And we see our colleagues that re-injecting themselves over and over and over again, you will notice that they age, they don’t age quite gracefully that age around the filler, their skin has a very fibrotic look about it, it’s quite plastinated it’s like sometimes I can’t put my finger on it. So even so the fillers do have to decompose in the skin or metabolise in the skin, but they’re replaced with a more fibrotic tissue. So what we want, where PRP won’t do that PRP will remove fibrotic tissue, remove synergid cells, remove anything that shouldn’t be in there and give it and then we have a new bed. The collagen to lay itself regenerates itself.

Trish  

Okay, so, so tell me is that cumulative as well? Like, I mean, I know this probably sounds ridiculous. But the more you do it, you like to reverse the signs of age like definitely, because this is what we all want. We don’t want a quick fix. We want to reverse it or that’s what I want.

Jeannie 

Most yeah, you definitely do reverse it and, you also slow it down. If PRP had been around in my 20s I would have had one a year and then immediately my third it’s one a year to prevent the wrinkles coming. Want to get into prevention so even people say how old young can you be to have PRPs? Start now, because we’re white people living in a very hot country. Um, and even the people that have come from India and Italy, Middle East, everything, they noticed that their melasma was worse, they noticed their pigment is worse, it’s become darkened. Start now, because all that is the sun damage showing through. So if you can start in your 20s, have one a year and then as you get older build it up, like I tried to have three a year now doesn’t always happen, with COVID and everything, but I did notice with COVID, my skin just went downhill very fast. Because I couldn’t have a PRP, yep. But the idea is to prevent and then, if you are in your 20s or 30s, then if you’re not, then you want to turn that clock back and you also want to remove the damage. To have good skin, you must remove the damage and PRP removes the damage from within because it’s injected into the subcutaneous layer, and it disperses into the dermis and the epidermis and even deeper than the subcutaneous layer. So those monocytes that are actually in that PRP will go through and clean up. It recognizes anything that shouldn’t be in there and cleans out. So the more PRP you have, the less rogue or say a rogue cell because that’s a rogue cell as a pre cancerous cell, pigmentation, a broad calories that are breaking ageing cell and it cells anything that’s going wrong in your skin is going wrong because of a cell or group of cells. You don’t want them in there because they cross talk and they communicate and they pass their damage around. They won’t stop that process.

Trish 

So, like how would a patient know because like, there’s a lot of companies out there doing some really, really good marketing, but they might not necessarily perform really good PRP or other things as well. But their marketing, like, I guess, marketing puffery is a good example, or maybe a good word is that yes, yes. How do we know where to go? Who will do it properly, because it’s a bit gnarly out there sometimes for people that don’t know.

Jeannie 

They can ask for proof. So first and foremost, that patient must consent to a procedure. To consent to a procedure, you must have all of the information. Okay. We know if we go and have Botox, we know that there’s a certain dose of botulinum toxin in that Botox or in the Dysport or in the Xeomin, or whatever they’re having. We know that when we buy a certain Vitamin A cream, we know there’s 1% or point 5% in that. We know if we have a filler, we know that there’s a certain percentage of hyaluronic, we know it’s crosslinked. If we have antibiotics, we know it’s proof that we don’t know with PRP, so the owner now is on to the patient or the client to actually ask them to pull it out of their cupboard and show you what you’re going to have. If it’s a tube, you know, it’s only plasma, then you can actually ask the question, what is the dose of platelets that you will be delivering to me into my skin, what is the dose, you want that number of 10 billion. Now anyone can pull that number out of the hat, you have to have the proof. Now that company that they bought the PRP from will have that proof. You asked for it because you cannot consent to a procedure and till you’ve had the information. And I’ve actually said this a lot of my PRP training to give the information to the patients, they know what they’re actually having. So when they see down the road, I can get PRP for $250. They’re aware of that difference so you must ask for it because it’s not a product, that is PRP, it is not a drug. Okay, a drug so your botulinum toxins and your holonic acids are classified as a drug so they are very specific in what they’re made of. But it’s up now that the patient has got to start demanding that they’re given the best and not just anything.

Trish 

So if I rock up at a clinic and I say okay, I will ask, what’s the dose of the PRP that you’re giving me? And I’ll say the tube and I want to hear from them that it’s 10 billion.

Jeannie 

And you want to see it too, because the companies will have the blood pathology results of their PRP and you can ask them well, okay, and ask for the data. So you want to ask for the data, the cell data and this is consenting to a procedure, you’re consenting to that particular PRP. So that patient can then read, oh, okay, this actually produces this. I’m going to go and enquire down the road, and then they go making an informed decision, which is consent. But unfortunately, that hasn’t happened in the PRP industry as it doesn’t happen when you are in the shopping centre purchasing cream, either. So and you also, it’s not just 10 billion, it’s 10 billion in seven mills. 

Trish  

Okay, so 10 billion in seven mills.

Jeannie 

So if they say to you 1 billion in five mils, or 1 billion in one mil, but you want to hear the magic number is 10 billion in seven mils.

Trish 

Okay. Okay. And so they can show me this on the documentation of the brand of their PRP?

Jeannie 

Yes, you can ask for it and definitely ask for it. And if they’re not forthcoming, then there’s an issue, because I do know that the whole blood cell separators that more sophisticated systems could have emailed to any potential client or patient in the blink of an eye.

Trish  

Okay. I had no idea. Like it’s true, though, because you want to know what you’re getting because I can remember years ago, I went and had a quote, Angel. Was it not too bad? Angel facelift? Yes, but that was where they just got my blood centrifuge to it, and then they put it on a cotton ball and then just dabbed it on my skin.

Jeannie 

Oh, that wouldn’t have been Angel. Okay, I’ve done something else. They’ve actually just used the term Angel facelift. They’re just anything that’s applied topically in the world of PRP is not a PRP treatment. Okay, they usually do something called a Vampire Facial, that’s actually a skin needling treatment and they just use plasma but you’re not having a PRP treatment. PRP is injected into the subcutaneous layer of the skin. That’s what a PRP says about the inner skin setting. There’s also muscular skeletal their sexual health is here. There’s all sorts of regenerative medicine applications, but in skin it is injected into the subcutaneous.

Trish 

Okay. And does this constant the concentration and dose of platelets? Is that kind of what we’re talking about? Or that makes a difference, hey?

Jeannie  

Yes, if they didn’t remember the dose, if you can just remember the dose, it’s easier. So the dose needs to be 10 billion platelets in seven mils for a face. So when you divide all of that up, that’s about 1.41 point 5 million platelets per microliter but you don’t have to remember that. You just remember 10 billion in seven mils.

Trish 

Yep, that is I even remembered that when you said the third time.

Jeannie 

Yes. You remember that the concentrations are already in that equation. So you don’t have to worry about that.

Trish  

Yep. And so, are there any other examples of marketing puffery that people need, should be aware of?

Jeannie 

Yes, yes. One is platelet rich fibrin. Okay. Now what’s happening there is it’s a tube system again, and this tube system doesn’t or the tube or coordinate system it’s a tube will not have anticoagulant in it. So when it is centrifuge, the plasma will form a gel. Now mind you, this is very weak. This is not a rich, leukocyte rich platelet rich plasma as we’ve talked about. Their claim is that they are delivering a higher number of growth factors because of the method. So I’ll just explain to you that when you do not use anticoagulants the platelets will activate outside of the body in the test tube itself and release its growth factors. If you inject the PRP, the PRP will release its growth factors when it cut when the platelet touches collagen, and the growth factors were released for the next two weeks, if you release your growth factors in a test tube outside of human, you haven’t got much time to inject that product because those growth factors must go somewhere and must go to a cell receptor and must get there quick. Okay, because they need somewhere to go. So that is puffery, because it is purely just plasma with some platelets in it. Now I want to go back a bit inside the platelet, you’ll see a little seed called a granule. Inside that granule contains the growth factors. The more platelets you have, the more growth factors you have. So if you have 10 billion platelets, and each platelet contains a million growth factors, or let’s say 100,000 growth factors, then you multiply that if you’re using plasma, then you’ve only got a billion platelets, and then that have, you know, 100,000 growth factors and you multiply that. So it’s impossible to have more growth factors than any other system in the world is what they say. It’s impossible to even make proper maths because they have lower platelets, low platelets, low growth factors, high platelets, high growth factors.

Trish 

So can you explain growth factors?

Jeannie 

A growth factor is contained inside the granule inside the platelet, and they perform something gotta keep it simple. They regenerate, they perform regenerative messages in the skin so they will attach to a cell receptor. And they will send a signal into that cell depending on which growth factor it is there’s multiple of them. And they all send a special message most of the all of the messages are to regenerate. Now if you have a significant dose of those platelets and the growth factors, the main one main message is it sees stem cells and it says, so wake up, my human is ailing, please regenerate. So growth doctors send this message and they can repair cell damage and repair DNA. They cross talk to other cells. Yeah, so that’s what they do and they are contained within the platelet.

Trish   

So, can you explain to us what all autologous PRP and PRF is?

Jeannie 

What autologous conditioned PRP I think is someone so autologous, just mean self. All PRP is taken from searching your blood used on that day. So the TGA laws are that the blood is taken from you on that day, and must be used on that day. So it can’t be stored in refrigerators or freezers or etc. So autologous just being self, there’s something else called autologous conditioned serum and that’s, again, as a little bit of a different pathway. But they have the same message as the platelet as the PRF message where they actually incubate the blood for several hours and 38 degrees and what’s interesting is that blood is already at 38 degrees. I do understand why they’re doing that but I’ll explain that in a minute. And they believe that they’re releasing more growth factors by doing that. Now, where that came from, is in a laboratory we are examining and in the activity of platelets, we don’t have we can’t examine that inside a human so we often examine that inside petri dish dishes of cells, we need to keep those cells alive so we have to put them in a human condition. Okay, so we put them in an incubator of 38 degrees is not just 38 degrees, it’s also 5% carbon dioxide because it must be kept under pressure. I’ve seen these incubators in beauty salons mostly. And it is just a very tiny and cheap incubator. And I really don’t understand why they’re incubating at all, especially when the platelets naturally release if they’re injected into the skin. But I have noticed that the product seems to do a lot of the Vampire Facial where the platelets or the growth factors are not doing the work at all the skin needling is actually doing the work. So there’s a lot of smoke and mirrors amongst some of these tube companies that are doing the Vampire Facial or that they have all these special names. You know, these puffery names, but at the end of the day, you want to see what’s going to be put into your skin. And if it’s a tube, you know, it’s very, very low in its platelet count. And there’s better out there. And it’s about shopping around this one more, that’s a bit strange. And I don’t know how this is allowed. They ‘re interesting. They advertise they have a ratio of 22 to one, a ratio of 22 anabolic cells to one catabolic cell. Now this is actually on websites and in print. And I’m very surprised that TGA hasn’t asked them to take it down. Now the reason for that is first and foremost, there’s no such thing as an anabolic cell, or a catabolic cell. That’s actually a pathway. And it’s a pathway that happens like a yin and a yang, and it’s part of your metabolism. So one breaks down energy for you to use, and one uses the energy, and they’re never out of sync. And if the only time they are out of sync is when you’ve been poisoned by cyanide and you die. So what they’re advertising is the reverse of cyanide cyanide poisoning. So I assume that if you did have a ratio of 22, to one anabolic to catabolic cells, you would be dead. So this is where the marketing really needs to be cleaned up in this industry, because it’s not even physiologically correct. 

Trish  

And, yeah, I was gonna say, and I think how they get away with it is the fact that nobody’s reported them because usually the TGA and they only act on reports, if someone reports someone, I think.

Jeannie 

That’s true. Yeah. And even that particular product, when you look up their TGA, reg RTG number, they’re just registered as a blood collection tube or blood collection tubes. Another thing in the puffery as well is that they claim to have patented gel in their tube. And it is corrected, it is patented, but it’s not patented by them. It’s exactly the same gel in every tube that has been patented by BD. And they get that gel from that company, but it’s not patented by the company selling the tube. You can get that same gel in a similar tube you can get for $15 and these people are paying $130 for these tubes, you know so the ISO numbers in those tubes are exactly the ISO numbers in the tubes that you have for pathology that we use in the lab. It’s not a unique patency to that company but legally they can say patented technology, but it’s not their technology.

Trish 

Got it. So tricky. Isn’t that mean?

Jeannie 

That actually, it’s actually really sad.

Trish 

It’s scary. So how does the clinic or even a patient choose a PRP?

Jeannie 

Well certainly go for the high dose, the high number 10s, the 10 billion in 7 mils.

Didn’t something in this person go billions and billions and billions and billions, that was Trump.

Trish 

I tried not to listen to anything that he said. So I want those.

Jeannie 

Billions and billions. If you remember that joke, 10 billion in 7 mils is in fact, that’s your best dose there. I do know, a musculoskeletal Doctor in Brisbane that even that goes even higher than that. For rotator cuffs and really difficult cases, he’s mastered an art. So you don’t want to be working under the tender implied that you’re really in the mediocre world, then it’s mediocre results, your best to really go and have just a skin peel. Yeah, that could be an equivalent result would be skin kill. And also people don’t understand that having your blood taken is still a risk. There’s a risk of infection, there’s a risk of swelling, there’s a risk of fainting. It’s an unnecessary risk to take, unless you’re going to do it properly.

Trish 

Yeah. Yep. Oh, I went to have it done once, but they couldn’t get my blood. Because I’ve got a really funny vein. So for someone who does get it done, so you go and get your blood taken in the morning, I don’t know. What’s the process? Like? How long would it take? Is this a day treatment?

Jeannie 

No, no less than an hour, so you have your blood taken. It’s depending on the system, that person’s purchase, that usually goes through a double centrifugation. So there’s a two spin process. And one nice thing about the plasma, they take the plasma out, and then they re-spin that, and then they create their platelet rich plasma so it usually takes about seven minutes. And then it’s ready for injection and then you will be nicely swollen for a couple of days, but nothing that you couldn’t go outside. Every injection has the risk of a bruise. I always say to people, when they say, Well, I bruise. I just hope so because then you get a better result and because that’s more platelets. And then slowly, slowly, you start seeing the changes. Other people see the changes. First they start saying Michael looking well, you’re looking really, really well. What have you done, what’s changed, but nothing has actually changed, other than they’re looking more vibrant more well. And then when I’ve seen that people have the three PRPs in a row four to six weeks apart. And then you see them three or four months after the third one. It’s honestly remarkable. You just think about what you had done, like what has happened, they’ve just been so amazing. And the PRP can also be combined with other procedures, lasers, skin needling, the b two injector, I’ve noticed that the filler companies are bringing out probably not using the right word but stimulants, biostimulants, or, you know, perfect because the thing about the bio remodelling is that it can’t take away rogue cells centred cells, it doesn’t have that. We call it phagocytosis like a weeding out but you could combine a PRP to prepare the skin for the bio modelling, so to speak.

Trish 

So, you know how you’re saying it takes about so, when you take the blood? How long does it have to be centrifuge for before you can actually use it on the patient’s like, do I have to take my blood?

Jeannie 

No, no, it’s right in front of you. Oh, yeah, right in front of you. So there’s usually like a double spin process. The first spins, two minutes and the second spins five minutes, then it’s drawn up and then it’s ready for injection.

Trish  

Oh, my goodness, wait, I thought you had to come back hours later when this was happening. 

Jeannie 

That other one called autologous conditioned serum that they’re cooking it in the incubator for several hours. Now you don’t need to do that because the incubated at 38 degrees, your blood is already 38 degrees. If it’s injected back straight into your skin. It’s injected back into 38 degrees. There’s no need. It’s all marketing.

Trish  

Yeah, yeah, got it. Okay. And you know, so you mentioned before about the HA fillers, you know how hyaluronic acid fillers, so why would the client choose PRP over HA fillers, because I know you mentioned before that the prevention of use of it?

Jeannie 

You can use both and a filler will always lay a better inner in a healthier skin. PRP will also do the whole face, the entire face with filler is really just in a certain area. So if you so the PRP will do the entire skin, if the person still wants more augmentation or then you could actually put the filler in but I would prepare the skin before filler. And then sometimes you find that they won’t want the filler at all. It’s only when people are not worn with cheekbones or have a receding chin or what to straighten their nose. PRP can’t change who you are. It just regenerates who you are. If they want that chin augmented, or they know they are straight or they weren’t born with cheekbones. PRP cannot give you what you never had. That you can work with both modalities for sure.

Trish  

Yeah, that makes sense. And like just to finish up so can you tell us a bit about the Vampire Facial? Because I know it was all the rage when KK had it done. But how does it differ from PRP injected or does it differ?

Jeannie 

Well, in injecting the PRP, you’re injecting it into the subcutaneous level into the fat cells and the PRP is very watery, and it releases its growth factors and it’s liquid till it sort of disperses. So it also disperses into the dermis and disperses deep into the deeper layers even down to that skeletal muscle. This is where your stem cells are the dose that we’re using, and the amount of growth factors being released commands the stem cells to regenerate to activate. They’re not on the surface of your skin. They’re not on that surface so when you’re having a Vampire Facial, they’ll do a skin needling and then sort of pour the plasma over the top. Now even if you think about a wound, a wound never heals from the outside in, a wound heals from the inside out, we regenerate from the inside out. Okay, so that’s why injecting it into that deeper layer is where you’re going to get the wow factor results. The superficial is really the skin needling is doing the work. If you think about it, when you skin needle somebody you’ve got a hole in the skin, what is in that hole at that time before you put anything on us. It’s filled with blood. How do you fill a hole that’s already filled with blood? You can’t. 

So it’s just blood or refacement. It’s smoke, it’s marketing. Now in a wound care clinic, and I’m working in a wound care clinic. We do apply PRP as a gel topically. But there’s a major process that goes with that because we may have been cells also we have to scrape that wound up. And there’s a lot of preparation that goes into packing that wound with a PRP gel and then each other opening the wound so that’s very different. Yeah. So that’s the difference. You want to inject that PRP into those deep layers so it disperses throughout all the layers and sends the message with the 10 billion platelets, multiply that by 100,000 on the whole growth factors regenerate me then you’ve got all the white blood cells that are cleaning everything out that shouldn’t be in there that’s creating the problem in the first place. And that’s what a filler can’t do. A filler doesn’t stop the problem, it covers up the problem but it doesn’t stop the problem.

Trish

Got it. Got it. Amazing. I’ve never had this treatment. I’ve wanted it for so long. But I’ve actually been too scared because I want to get it done properly. You know what I’m thinking I’m gonna do I’m gonna do probably otherwise work during the thing so what three treatments four to six weeks apart and then once a year as a top up?

Jeannie 

No, it depends on your age. Every six months is okay and can have a treatment in between. Nothing beats good skincare used on a daily basis. The clinic will also be offering pills and led and some lasers and it’s a little bit like going to the gym. A personal trainer never gives one exercise for one muscle, they’ll give three exercises for one muscle. And the skin is the same dieting, the same losing weights, the same exercises the same and life is the same. And the skin is no different, it is the same. So, PRP is dermal therapy. It is not in the filler category, Dermal Therapy is Regenerative Dermal Therapy.

Trish

Yep. And so do you do this? Do you offer this treatment?

Jeannie

No, no, I do training. I don’t. I have had a clinic before where I worked with a doctor, but at the moment I’m studying but I do the training for but I will only train for the high end companies.

Trish 

Yeah, I won’t. And so you should with that study.

Jeannie

Or walk in the person’s got a tube I’m like.

Trish 

I gotta say that that’s been so interesting, because I was so interested in PRP the first time I heard about it. Oh, my God, this is great. Because I’m all into a natural look, don’t get me wrong, I will have done anything that I think is gonna make me look younger, better or whatever, or virtually anything. But I love the thought of the PRP because it is so natural. It’s so your own body and I didn’t even realise that it’s quite it’s reversing, I didn’t realise that it was. I mean, I’ve heard it before but until we spoke I didn’t actually realise that it was actually really regenerative.

Jeannie

It’ll give you back the volume that you’ve lost, so to people that are getting the fillers, to get the volume back in their cheeks, the PRP will actually do that to you and it’s natural volume is putting the volume in there. It was sort of fake, but not fixing the problem and you want your own natural juicy cheeks back. You don’t want these artificial palm pomp ping pong balls, I see them and they move around, I see the girls year after year and the chick jumps around, and their skin is ageing around the filler and they keep putting little bits of filler back in back in back in. And next thing it forms all these lumps in their skin. And that is evident every time we go to a cosmetic conference and we see them year after year and that they’re not the same person in any way, shape or form.

Trish  

I know exactly what you mean. And it’s really funny because I had some filler put in my temples. And then I felt that and it freaked me out but I could feel it moving down. I thought it would move but of course it’s only you know, it’s gonna be where it’s injected. But of course it can move.

Jeannie

Yeah, my great. Absolutely.

Trish  

I had no idea it freaked me out. But anyway. Yeah, I’ve got to say thank you so much, Jeanne. That’s been so interesting. Just to close off 10 billion in 7 mil.

Jeannie

Yes. 10 billion in seven mils of plasma.

Trish

10 billion platelets in seven mils of plasma. Yes. I’m gonna make that my mantra for a week and see if I can remember it forever.

Jeannie

Um, thank you so much. 

Trish

That’s been wonderful chatting with you. Thank you so much. 

Bye bye.

 

If you want to know more about Dermal Regenerative Therapy using PRP, check Jeannie’s Instagram here

For Jeannie’s latest published PRP article, go here

 

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