Dr Shahidi on Rhinoplasty and Stratamed

We chatted with Dr. Shahram Shahidi on today’s podcast about Rhinoplasty surgery and Stratamed post-surgery.
Dr. Shahidi has performed thousands of Rhinoplasties over the past 15 years. His treatment philosophy is to create not just an aesthetically natural and beautiful nose but a healthy, functional airway.
We can’t wait to share it with you all.
Follow Dr Shahidi on Facebook and Instagram!

Transcript – Dr Shahidi on Rhinoplasty and Stratamed

Trish

Hello, listeners. It’s Trish Hammond and also Nicole Montgomery. And we’re from the Aesthetics Uncensored podcast and today we are over excited because we are talking to someone that we’ve been dying to speak to for ages. So we’re talking to Dr. Shahidi. Now, Dr. Shahidi is a rhinoplasty Specialist based in Sydney and that’s pretty much what he does all the time. So he knows his stuff so we’re looking forward to this. So welcome, Dr. Shahidi.

Dr. Shahidi

Thank you so much for having me. Lovely to be here.

Trish

Oh, god, thank you so much for being on our podcast. I can’t wait to have a chat with you.

Nicole

Yeah, We’re excited.

Trish

I know you do. Anyway, can you first of all, can you tell us a bit about you know how or why you decided to become an ENT Specialist, because you’re an ENT Specialist, but you pretty much only do noses now. Is that right?

Dr. Shahidi

Yeah, that’s correct. Look, I mean, it goes back 20 years ago. Initially when I started, I started doing general surgery, I did general surgery for years and then after that, I sort of specialise in one area, and it was the choice between doing ENT or plastics and I was interested in noses. And at a time, I thought it would be better to do the ENT training because then I would get to understand and know intimately about noses, about the function, about how they work, about the aesthetics of it. So when I finished my training, that was 2003, so that’s almost 20 years ago, I went and spent another year, both in Australia and overseas in the states and UK, where I specialise in rhinoplasty and facial plastic surgery. So when I came back, that’s basically what I got into and initially, I was doing a lot more in terms of the functional surgeries like sinuses and airways and over time, it sort of became more aesthetics and functional so a combination of both. So pretty much as you said, yeah, that’s all I do. I breathe and, you know, everything I do, in my working life around noses.

Trish

You know, it’s really funny, because I love it. And I love the fact that you become a master of what you do, because it’s not like you do 15 different procedures, you do one procedure, but you do it differently. Of course, like, you know, everyone’s different. It’s not like you do the same thing for everyone, but it’s that one procedure, so you really know your noses?

Trish

I’m back. I’m sorry.

Dr. Shahidi

Could you pause for a second.

Trish

I know, 

Dr. Shahidi

We missed what you said.

Trish

I said, I just love the fact that you specialise in one procedure. I mean, every patient is, of course, different. You don’t do the same for everyone but once you specialise in one procedure, and I love it, because as a patient, I know that I can go to someone that only does that, and I’m going to get the best job. There’s no doubt about it.

Dr. Shahidi

Look, I think, from our point of view, and my team, it also makes it easier because my team knows everything about it the intimately in tune with the whole rhinoplasty, so everybody in the team knows and understands that they can answer it, it’s not like that we would get 50 different questions about different operations, and everybody has to know what’s happening. So from that point of view, it also makes it easier and it just streamlines the whole process. And again, once you do one thing and you do it over and over and over again, you just get good at it, you become comfortable at it, and they just know everything about it.

Trish

Yeah, that’s so true. And I was gonna ask you so there’s different types of rhinoplasty, isn’t there?

Dr. Shahidi

Yeah, look, broadly speaking, you can either make noses smaller or make them bigger. So if you make them bigger, that’s augmentation, rhinoplasty which is more common in patients with Asian heritage who’ve got smaller noses and they want to have a bigger nose. And the other type which is what I predominantly do is reduction rhinoplasty somebody comes in with a bigger nose the want a smaller nose, more refined nose, so that’s what I predominantly do reduction rhinoplasty and then with once you decided that you want to do a rhinoplasty then you’re going to, I need to make an assessment as to what the best approaches for that particular patient. I can do the operation through the nostrils which is called closed rhinoplasty with there’s no external cuts or incisions to the skin or whether I have to open up the nose which is called an open rhinoplasty and that is when I’ll make a little cut between the two nostrils where the skin is and you just make a tiny cut and then you can open the nose up like a bonnet of a car and then you can just make changes I need. When I started, that was in 2003, or predominantly did everything closed so there were no incisions, it was scarless, it was internal. What I found was, we were getting great results, it’s just that the tip of the nose, it was hard to get it perfect or get the projection or the measurements right. And in those cases, I started opening up the nose, so I can reset the tip to exactly where I wanted. And over time, I just felt that I could get more predictable outcomes and results with an open rhinoplasty. So now predominantly do open rhinoplasty, and because now do open rhinoplasty, that we’ve got a tiny little incision between the two nostrils, and that skin needs to heal. And usually, we’ve tried varieties of different stitches and sutures and techniques, and how to minimise the scarring in that area. And then I’ve started using different types of gels and silicone creams and one of them is the Stratamed that we’ve spoken about, which is a sort of a scar therapy gel that I give to the patients to put where the incision is, and that helps that incision heal. So pretty much in about six months time, once you have a look at it, that incision is imperceptible, it’s almost impossible to see. And I just find that with opening the nose, I can get a better precision to the tip of the nose. And using a scar cream and different techniques, we can sort of make the scar almost disappear. So I’m quite comfortable with that technique and that’s predominantly what I do now.

Trish

Right? So the one that you’re talking about is the open one because you kind of cut it here and then lift it up. And I guess you’re right. So because you’re using Stratamed,  that’s the one that you can use. When before the wound is healed for the scarring. You put that straight on during surgery?

Dr. Shahidi

It’s not during the surgery, during the surgery, I usually use antibiotic ointments. And then we send the patient home and I put special stitches into that incision, which are dissolvable stitches. And once they take a few days, maybe a couple of weeks to dissolve. I still use an antibiotic ointment and then as soon as they’ve dissolved, I start going on to Stratamed. And we are used to being Stratamed for many months after the surgery and I just find that it works really well and it helps heal that incision impeccably.

Trish

Yeah, because although it’s any little, it’s right there on your face. Hey, so you do want to be good.

Dr. Shahidi

Yeah, and he’s sort of under the nose, it’s hard to see. So that’s really the only incision I make. However, if a patient has got a wider nostrils and the wonder nostrils tucked in, and also make another incision in the sort of groove of the nostril and the and the sill of the nostril to tighten the nostrils and there’s another incision there and then if you have that extra incision, again I use dissolvable sutures, a plus Stratamed to make that incision heal almost invisible.

Trish

Right. That’s exactly what I had done because I had a rhinoplasty about 20 years ago, and I asked my nostrils to be narrowed so he did that. And I had obviously had that little thing there as well and you can actually see my scar of the look but there was nothing like Stratamed around those days.

Dr. Shahidi

No, I think using silicone gels have been available, but trying to find one that works well. Look about 10 years ago when I started doing open rhinoplasty and we tried varieties of different creams and silicone gels, etc. And I think once I started using Stratamed, it was working really well so we’ve stuck to it. So the past many years we’ve been using it with great success.

Trish

Amazing. And Nicole’s got a couple of questions she wants to ask.

Dr. Shahidi

Sure.

Nicole

I do, we are such stalkers on your Instagram. I know I’m going a little bit left field. You have some incredible before and after. I don’t know if you can see my screen.

Dr. Shahidi 

Yes. I can. 

Nicole

When I’m looking at your Instagram I look at these photos and you’ve got one here really great one of the guy who looks like he’s a bit of a tradie with a rather large nose and as you’ve mentioned, you know going down size and the other this other lady with it looks like she you know has worked night shift for 100 years because she looks so tired and her nose is just such a huge focus on her face because it takes over the whole face. I would love to know what if you can share with us one of your favourite stories from one of these people on not so much the aesthetic improvement which is so obvious and I’m sure functionally as well. But how does it change their lives? From a confidence perspective.

Dr. Shahidi

Oh, look, there’s a huge confidence boost. So first of all, before any rhinoplasty, we’ve got to make sure that the patient knows what they’re getting into, we have to make sure that they understand the limitations of surgery, that they have to understand what can or cannot be achieved, they have to have a realistic expectation. And then if they’ve come into the rhinoplasty with the right mindset, and if they’ve got the right attitude, and as well as having the right anatomy, that the result is life changing. First of all, my emphasis in rhinoplasty is making sure the patient’s function is also improved. So what I do is called functional aesthetic rhinoplasty, where you want the patient to look good, but breathe well as well. And a lot of the times patients come back to me and say, Look, I had no idea how bad my breathing was before the surgery, now I can sleep much better, I can breathe much better, my exercise tolerance has improved, and are just shocked by how much improvement in my life is. And they would say to me, Oh, when I used to do pilates and yoga, I couldn’t breathe through my nose, I had to pull my face to the side. Now I can just breathe so much better. So that’s really a good feeling for me to know that I’ve actually not only just aesthetically improved the patient, but functionally, from the aesthetic point of view, looked at countless stories that I continue to look at. I’ve been doing this for a long time. And over the past 20 years, I’ve done 1000s and 1000s of patients. So there is no one particular story. But I remember a story of a young man who went for different job interviews, and he just couldn’t nail it. He couldn’t nail it and then once he had his nose done, it was just a confidence which was just shining through and then he nailed it. He got the job of his dreams. And he was telling me Look, I really believe that it was my nose that made me get that job. Because I think to be honest with you, I don’t think it was the nose, it was him. He got the job. But the fact that he walked in there confident and he felt good about himself just came through. And I think that was the main one of the reasons why he was successful. And I think putting it, you know, the whole confidence thing that the patients get, it is just an amazing reward for me.

Trish

You know, I agree with you 1,000,000%, because that’s how I felt too. But one thing that I think where the magic or to me the magic that I see in your rhinoplasties is the fact that you have actually perfected what you do at the tip because like, a lot of people have that bulbous tip, and then they have the nose job. But you’re still that, the thing is still a bit but your tips tend to they all have that they finished properly, if that makes it or not probably just finished the way that I would like it.

Dr. Shahidi

Yeah, look, I tell you what, I spend a lot of time in the operating theatre with a ruler, I’ve got a sterile ruler, measure everything, I measure everything to the millimetre, measure it and re-measure it and I’ll look at it and are measured, I spent a lot of time just trying to get that tip to where I wanted that perfect position. And so there’s a lot of and also the varieties of techniques that are used to try to get that as good of a tip as I can. But don’t forget, one of the problems with rhinoplasty is the thickness of the skin, so if somebody has got a thick skin, it’s very hard to get that perfect definition at the tip. It’s the skin sort of turns into is like a sort of a thick blanket that goes on top, I sort of say to the patient is like you’ve gone to the gym, and you’ve got this amazing body, and then you put this big pull over the jumper on top and nobody can see your amazing body is a bit like that if somebody has got thick skin, that thick skin hides detail of the tip. But if somebody has reasonably thick skin, you can get the tip of the nose really nicely and it would really show through that the nose is proportioned and the angles and the measurements are all in proportion to the rest of the patient’s features and face.

Trish

That makes so much sense. I didn’t even realise that the skin would be a thing but that makes sense. Wouldn’t it round as much?

Dr. Shahidi

Look, when you’re making those smaller, you’re going to have excess skin. Yeah, that excess skin has to shrink to the new nose and if somebody has thin skin, it shrinks quite quickly. If somebody has got thicker skin that takes a lot longer to heal, and that might take even 12 to 18 months for the skin to heal to the new nose or sort of say to the patient is like somebody who has been overweight and lost weight. If they lose a little bit of weight, the skin tightens up but if they lose megamass away they’re going to have all this excess skin and this is relative with the nose, if I make the nose a little bit smaller, the skin tightens. But if you make the nose too small, that skin is going to be too big for the nose. And it just doesn’t tighten up and doesn’t shrink wrap to the new nose so you’ve got to be cautious in how much you make the nose smaller depending on the thickness of the skin and everybody heals differently. Some people heal really quickly, some people heal a bit slower, it depends on your genetics, it depends on how you look after it. And it’s quite important that post op, we give a lot of patients different exercises and programs to try to tighten their skin and improve that skin quality and that takes a long time. So a lot of those patients that you see online and on Instagram to give a very small percentage of my patients, a lot of my patients like to be private, they don’t want to show the journey online and the ones who are happy to show them we, we’re very happy to see the outcomes and celebrate the success with them.

Trish

Yeah, actually Nicole has a good question, but I want to ask you something before she sneaks in. I was just gonna ask you, does a patient come to you and say, This is what I want my nose to look like. Or do you look at a patient’s nose and say this is what’s going to suit you for the rest of your features?

Dr. Shahidi

Look, it’s a combination of both. When a patient comes and sits in front of me, I say to them, Look, what I want to do during this consultation is to determine whether your wishes and wants with your nose are compatible with what I can achieve. So the first consultation is really to work out. Is that patient a suitable candidate for the type of operation I do or not? If it’s not suitable, or just tell them I’m sorry, you know, what you want cannot be achieved. So I asked them, “What is it about the nose you’re not happy with? And what are you trying to achieve? What is your expectation?” and a lot of the times they say to me, Look, I’ve got a photo, can I show you a photo, I say, Sure, show me the photo, then I have a look at the photo, then once I’ve had an opportunity to take the history and examine them and take the photo, then I work out whether what they want is achievable with what they’ve got or not. Because I cannot change the skin, I cannot take the nose off and put a new one on, I can only work with what I’ve got so then that’s part of that consultation. Okay, this is what you want, this is what you have can get you there. And a lot of the times we can get the patient close, we can never do 100%. And then I tell them, Look, I can get you halfway there. I can get you like 80% there, but I can’t get you 100%. And I make sure that they understand what is achievable. So I do look at a lot of photos when the patients bring them in. I sometimes tell them I’m sorry, what you want is just not possible with what you’ve got and I just wanted to understand that because otherwise, we don’t want them to get disappointed and not be happy with the outcome.

Nicole

As you’re saying this, all I’m thinking about is Michael Jackson. What on earth went wrong with his nose?

Dr. Shahidi

I think what went wrong was a combination of things. He was obviously not happy within his own skin. He obviously had complex issues, and he wanted to change his appearance and I think it was his push to have something done. And obviously there were doctors out there who were happy to see he was a famous celebrity. I guess if a famous celebrity comes to you and puts pressure on you and says oh, can you please do this for me? And you know, a lot of people may yield to that and say, Okay, let’s give it a go. And I think what happened to him was, again, this is just speculation, but I suspect what happened was multiple surgeries and he had an unrealistic expectation. He wanted a very thin narrow nose, but you know, just genetically and also the type of skin he had and the type of nose he had, may not have been suitable for what he wanted so they kept operating and they kept chopping away at the cartilage. And I think it will go to the point that the skin just shrinks around. What was the remaining cartilage and he was just wearing masks when nobody else was wearing masks because he was trying to hide the whole disaster that was under his nose. But look, I do feel sorry for him. I don’t think he deserved that. And I think he was just a combination of having an unrealistic expectation.  

Trish

And he has a lot of money. 

Nicole

Yeah.

Dr. Shahidi

Exactly. And a lot of money and fame and you know, I am sure you would have put a lot of pressure on the doctors and asking them, Come on, can you please do another surgery, put another one to another one and then you know, we saw the result.

Trish

That’d be scary.

Nicole

Strange things with rhinoplasty, is that with most other surgeries or with a lot of other surgeries, you can go back and have revision after six months. But with rhinoplasty it seems like the swelling lasts forever.

Dr. Shahidi

Yeah, that’s true. And I look it does take a long time and then if you go back too early, you go backwards and you’re also going to disrupt the whole healing process. Look, I mean, other types of cosmetic or plastic surgery for example, you know, where there is an implant you put an implant in. And sure he’s got his own risks and complications, but worst case scenario, you can take it out, you can take the implant out or change it, change the position, reposition a different size, but with a rhinoplasty there’s no implants. Alright, there is but not for the reduction of rhinoplasty. For the augmentation rhinoplasty they can use silicone etc. But with a reduction rhinoplasty, you’re basically trimming the structure of the nose, you’re trimming the cartilage, you’re trimming the bone, and then you’re waiting for that to heal. And don’t forget your nose is open to the environment, there’s bacteria and viruses is COVID all of that so the nose has to heal and is trying to also defend itself against all the environmental factors. And that just takes a long time dealing with the lining of the nose which is mucosa, you dealing with the cartilage, you dealing with bone, you dealing with skin, all of that put together and it just takes a long time. And you just don’t want to just open the nose and do something and open it and do something. It’s just basically you are slowing down to healing. And in some cases, you may actually compromise the blood supply to the skin and you can damage the skin irreversibly which would be a disaster.

Nicole

If I was having a rhinoplasty for a wedding or had saved for years and was finally having what would normally tell patients is the expected time.

Dr. Shahidi

Initially, look, two weeks of bruising is pretty much standard and the first month I call that the ugly stage, that first few weeks is just not a fun time. So if you’re getting married and you want to get rhinoplasty, give yourself a good 12 to 18 months, you don’t come to me three weeks before the wedding, I would basically tell you to go and have your wedding, have your honeymoon and then come back. So you’ve got a plan for it and give yourself plenty of time to recover and plenty of time to get that final outcome.

Trish

That makes sense. 

Nicole

And does the Stratamed or Strataderm help with protecting you from the environment because it has a silicone coating?

Dr. Shahidi

It does. It is actually Stratamed that have bacteriostatic properties, which reduces the risk of getting a bacterial infection. But ultimately, the inside of your nose is open to the environment and you’re not putting the Stratamed inside the nose, you’re just putting on an incision. So the incision is the small part but the rest of the nose is open. You breathe through it every day, you pick up pollen, pollution, pick up bacteria, viruses, and the nose has to deal with all of that and lower people get allergies as well and the allergies cause inflammation of the nose as well. So that’s another thing that I spent a bit of time trying to deal with trying to manage the patient’s allergies and to improve the final outcome. 

Trish

Do you have any idea how many rhinoplasties you’ve done?

Dr. Shahidi

We’ll look to be honest with you over 20 years, I don’t know how many 1000s? Multiple 1000s? Yeah, it would be easily over 3000 or even more? I don’t know exactly, but yeah, many multiple 1000s. 

Trish

Yes. Just like it’s just so crazy. And just like how long would a rhinoplasty take you roughly?

Dr. Shahidi

About two, two and a half hours? Okay. That’s pretty standard, two hours is minimum, two and a half hours sometimes look, it takes as long as it takes. So generally speaking about two, two and a half, but if it’s something if I have to spend more time, I spend more time I just keep going. I don’t look at the time, I just keep going until I am 100% happy that I can not do any better and that’s when I stop and I don’t look at the time. And I just persist until I am happy that I’ve done the best I can.

Trish

Yeah. And I was also going to ask you, is there anything special that a patient needs to do to prepare for a rhinoplasty?

Dr. Shahidi

Yeah, absolutely. Look, I’ve actually got an app and my app has two sections on it. I’ve got pre op instructions and we sort of tell the patients what to do. You want to operate on patients who are healthy, both physically and emotionally healthy so they have to be in the right frame of mind. And they have to have adequate nutrition, adequate health they have, otherwise the healing would be compromised. So there’s a whole specific number of things that I get the patients to do before the surgery, if they’re a smoker, I really don’t want them to smoke. If, for example, if they’ve got any health issues, we want to optimise them. If they’re low on Iron anaemic, we want to optimise it. There are certain nutritional supplements that I asked the patients to start prior to the surgery and simple things like vitamin C, Zinc, all of that helps with a patient and then once the patient has had an operation, or wants to take protein, so if somebody is not a good protein taker, and didn’t have adequate amount of protein in the diet, we asked them to supplement it. And there are plenty of good ones if they’re vegetarian and want to take some vegan proteins, there’s plenty of it out there. But they need to have a conscious effort to make sure that they get adequate nutrition, adequate minerals, adequate vitamins into the diet, and health. Health is very important. Also, the other important thing with health is sleep to have to sleep well so that’s when a lot of the healing occurs while you’re sleeping and resting. So I really, I’m very pedantic about what the patients do before and after the surgery and I asked everybody to download my app, go through it, and make sure they understand it. And I encouraged them to ask me questions, and I tried to educate them about the whole process of healing.

Trish

Yeah, do you do any revision rhinoplasties where someone may have been somewhere else or even your own mind, because it’s not gonna like because no one’s going to get 100% perfect result every time.

Dr. Shahidi

Look right now with the COVID. I am so backlogged that I don’t even have enough time to do my primary rhinoplasty. So unfortunately, when people ring up, and they want to have a revision, I say to them, Look, I don’t have the time to do because revision takes a lot longer, the operation is longer, the recovery is longer, it’s sometimes you need to put rib graft and extra grafting in there and I just literally don’t have the time. So at the moment, I’ve closed my books, to revision rhinoplasties. And once I get on top of my backlog, maybe I open up the book, I don’t know when that’s going to happen. However, with my own cases, if the patient’s something hasn’t healed, right, for example, give you a simple example, when we shave the nasal bone, when you shave the bone, that bone is alive. As far as the bone is concerned, it’s been traumatised, so the bone wants to heal back and sometimes it heals back with little osteophytes, or little knobs of bone. And if that happens, and if I can’t just simply correct it with a needle in my office, I may have to take the passion back and do a little bit of a rasp or filing of that area. So I do look, we all have to deal with revision patients of our own but it’s not common, it’s not uncommon that I have to revise patients. But if you need to, we just have to deal with it and I do follow up patients quite regularly for about 12 months or longer. And most of the issues we can deal with in the office, but every now and then there would be somebody that I have to take back to see it and just do a touch up. That’s just part of the nature of the surgery, you can never get a perfect outcome in every patient. It’s like asking, you know, Tiger Woods to get a hole in one in, in every one. Roger Federer to win every game, it’s just not realistic. You get a good outcome most of the time, but there’s going to be somebody who something happens.

Trish

Yeah.Can I just ask you one last question. So are there any unique issues that can arise after rhinoplasty that can affect the wound or the start outcome?

Dr. Shahidi

Sure. Number one is smoking. I don’t want people to smoke because the smokers tend to have a higher risk of healing and the other thing that can happen is infection. And we don’t want people to get infected. And we asked everybody not to blow their nose specifically, make sure that they wash their hands, and everything needs to be sterile. So we want to avoid any possibility of infection. And we also want the other important thing for the wound to heal is lack of tension. So you want to make sure that the nose that has been healed has no extra tension on the scar tissues. Because if there’s tension, that’s what makes the scars heal poorly. So it’s quite important for them to avoid certain things and trauma. You don’t want them to bump their nose. So I ask everybody to be super careful about injuring the nose in the first few weeks after the surgery, because you could easily damage the nose and undo all the good work.

Trish

Yeah. 

Nicole

It’s very confusing for some people to see or consult when having rhinoplasty between an ENT and a Plastic Surgeon. If I was to be in a car accident or punched in the face, who would fix my nose? If I go to hospital? Is it an ENt or is it Plastic?

Dr. Shahidi

No, it depends which hospital you go to for a different cover. So both EMT and plastics, we both trained to deal with noses. And however, from the EMT point of view, our emphasis is more on the function and the breathing. So it depends. Look, when I was in a public hospital. This goes back in the past 20 years when I was a registrar that we didn’t have a Plastic Registrar. So I, as the ENT Surgeon, did all the facial traumas and that was the way it was. And when I was at Newcastle, John Hunter, we had no Plastic Registrar, so as an ENT Surgeon, we did, we dealt with all of those. So it really depends on which hospital you go to for availability and also expertise. Just because somebody is done at the end doesn’t mean they’re good witnesses, they might be at the end but sub specialise in head and neck surgery or ear surgery and the same with Plastics. A Plastic Surgeon will specialise in burns and skin cancer. So really, it’s not the special specialty, it’s more the person’s experience and if God forbid you had an accident, you went to the hospital. It just depends who’s on call at the time.

Nicole

We’ve just said your books are closed. So clearly not. 

Dr. Shahidi

My books are closed for redo surgery.

Nicole

Do you take trauma patients?

Dr. Shahidi

Absolutely. We do it all the time. Patients who have I mean, look, we get a lot of patients with broken noses, people bragging about us all the time. So we deal with them, but which is very different to redo or revision surgery. Revision surgery is somebody who has had surgery, there is a problem, they want to have another surgery. And it’s just a totally different mindset, a different operation, which is different to somebody who was playing footy and got hit in the face and broke his nose and we see them all the time. And to reset the nose is a different operation to a rhinoplasty because of the closed reduction where you basically manipulate the nose into this position prior to the injury. That’s a very different operation, again to rhinoplasty. Now, if somebody has had major facial trauma, obviously that’s because I don’t work in the trauma hospital, I tend not to see that. But fractured noses, we see a lot of fractured noses. 

Nicole

I want to know how to get a nose job.  Oh god, it sounds so painful. But it would be awful going to, you know, a public hospital because I assume that we’d go after trauma. And not knowing who the surgeon was, not knowing how it was going to be your teenage child, you’d be especially googling.

Dr. Shahidi

Look, to be honest with you. We do have amazing public hospitals and to do my surgical training, obviously, I work in the public hospital. And look, the standard of surgery and medicine in Australia is really high up there. So to be honest with you, in case of an emergency, when you go to the hospital, you can be pretty certain that you’re going to get amazing care. And however if you know somebody who happens to be an expert, a rhinoplasty Surgeon that happens to be on call or available, that’s a bonus, but otherwise, I have no doubt he would get world standard care in our hospital system.

Trish

Yeah.

Nicole

That’s so lovely to say.

Dr. Shahidi

That’s the truth. I mean, I’ve worked in the hospital system and I know everybody’s dedicated, all the staff are dedicated nurses and doctors and the registrar’s who are on call. They’ve all been selected for who they are and their dedication so I think whoever is on call, you would get a good care. I have no doubt about that. In fact, if anything happens to my children, I’m more than happy to trust the system.

Trish

On that topic. Do you get to see your children with all the surgery that you do? 

Dr. Shahidi

No. I do, I do call them.

Trish

Oh, that’s right. Thank you so much for joining us. And it’s just been so insightful. I guess I probably would just want to ask you one little, I could actually talk to you all night because I got a minute. When you do a procedure, so the patient comes to so you had this surgery? And did they stay in the hospital room?

Dr. Shahidi

No, it’s just a day surgery. They just come in and they can go home.

Trish

Do they go home with a thing on the nose? Like, yeah.

Dr. Shahidi

Yes.

Trish

Yeah. And then they come back  to see you when?

Dr. Shahidi

About a week later, usually eight days later.

Trish

Okay.  And I bet you, you must get so much joy and contentment out of them when they take off that thing. And that, that moment that they look at themselves, and 99% of them start crying.

Dr. Shahidi

A lot of them do. But I think it’s more of a shock to the system, like, Oh my God, look, the first few weeks are quite emotional and really, you really get the outcome when they come back in like 12 months time and say, look at the beginning I was a bit or wasn’t sure. It was a bit smaller and my smile was a bit funny. But now, I love it and it’s amazing. And it’s quite funny that everybody forgets what they used to look like and then when they look at their own photos from like, a year or two before that, Oh, God did not look like that. Amazing. It just becomes a new normal.

Trish

Yeah. I wish when I had mine done that we had phones because I would have just taken so many photos because to me, I look like I always have and then I look at my photos of before. And I’ve still got the same nose really it’s just a bit narrower. It could have done a whole lot better job. But anyway, not better done. No, not at all. I wish I’d had like I wish I had done now. But yes, very discerning. 

Dr. Shahidi

Look, we’re getting better at it. I mean, 20 years ago, a lot of things have improved: the techniques, teachers, medication, phones, everything has improved. We didn’t even have mobile phones 20 years ago.

Trish

I know and would like to say thank you so much for sharing all your insights. We’ve really been looking forward to talking to you because obviously we’ve seen all of your things online but we’ve never really communicated you know, ever had to communicate before except for that growing desire to just want to have a nose job by you.

Dr. Shahidi

No, thank you so much. It was lovely to be with you guys and have a chat with you.

Trish

Thank you. And this is looking to do one look up Dr. Shahidi. You just look him up. Like won’t take long to find him but it’s S-H-A-H-I-D-I. So it’s drshahidi.com. You’ll find him on Instagram. You’ll find him on the web. And yeah, just check him out. So thank you so much for joining us. Dr. Shahidi.

Dr. Shahidi

You’re welcome. Thank you for having me. Lovely to talk to you.

Nicole

Thank you. Have a beautiful weekend. 

 

Dr. Shahidi

You too. Have a dry one.

Trish

Thank you, bye.

You can find out more about Strataderm here. https://strataderm.com/

Check out Dr. Shahidi profile on Anybodi https://anybodi.com.au/members/

Easy access to Dr Shahidi 

Instagram: www.instagram.com/drshahidi.aus/

Website: www.drshahidi.com/

You can check out the Stratpharma range of products here.

Instagram: www.instagram.com/stratpharma_australia/

Website: https://au.stratpharma-shop.com/

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Well, like all good quickies it's time to dust off and get back to our day jobs! If you liked the podcast please rate us because we need the validation for our fragile hearts. If you have a story to share or have a burning question you would like us to cover please slide into our DM’s on Instagram at @transformingbodiespodcast. Stay positive, keep your boobs and chins high until we chat again xoxo Trish