The History of Cosmetic Medicine

Another informative and insightful podcast with Dr. Maz as he chats with Trish and Nicole about the secret history of Cosmetic Medicine – from anti-wrinkle treatments to how long does the treatment last for dermal fillers.
Dr Mariusz Gajewski has dedicated his career to medicine and the art of Cosmetic Procedures. He graduated from the University of Sydney in 1995 completing a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery.
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@star_cosmetic_medicine @trishyhammond @anybodi_aesthetics @anybodi_industry
Transcript – The History of Cosmetic Medicine 

Trish

Hello, listeners. It’s Trish Hammond here together with Nicole Montgomery and we’re from the Aesthetics Uncensored podcast. And today we are joined by the delightful Dr. Maz. Now Dr. Maz is the director of Star Cosmetic Medicine which is based in Sydney and also in Darlinghurst. And today, we’ve got a really interesting topic. And we’re going to talk about the secret of cosmetic medicine. It’s kind of like the secrets of cosmetic medicine. Hey, Dr. Maz.

Dr. Maz

The questions that’s something that people talk about and there’s a lot of myths, misconceptions. It’s good to talk about the real history of it from the perspective of someone that works in the industry.

Trish

And on that you’ve been in the industry for quite a while haven’t you?

Dr. Maz

More than I’d like to admit.

Trish

So how long are you going a bit too?

Dr. Maz

Well, been doing cosmetic medicine for about 20 years or before that I was an ICU doctor.

Trish

That’s what I was gonna ask you. So what led you to choose cosmetic medicine when you’re working in ICU?

Dr. Maz

That’s a good question. I have always been in a lot of areas, surgery, emergency ICU, but also cosmetic medicine. And particularly cosmetic medicine, we’re dealing with concepts of creativity and beauty. Most medicine for good reasons is for Reductionists dealing with ways of doing things, protocols, algorithms. But it’s great to be working on something that’s a lot more nebulous and a lot more creative.

Trish 

And I guess, for me as well as the aesthetic industry is the fact that I want to look good. I want to know what’s out there that looks good. And I want to hear about all the latest things that can make you look or look better and not necessarily look good but I want to look the best I possibly can for my age and my well being I guess of course. So that’s the look for me. So I wonder whether a lot of people get into it because they want to look good. Why did you become a nurse, Nicole?

Nicole

Sorry. I was looking at Dr. Maz website. Oh, my goodness. Definitely not to look good. Now I started nursing to help people. It makes me feel better about myself. Helping others. So that’s what I like about nursing.

Trish

Yep. Well Like doctors and nurses. I just admire you both so much because I couldn’t do it. I’m happy to go and get anything done. But I just couldn’t do what

Dr. Maz

Trish? Why do you think he couldn’t do it? You obviously have an interest in aesthetics?

Trish

I do. I know. I just don’t I wouldn’t be that dedicated to the study. And I just want to look good. I wouldn’t actually want to  worry about others looking as good as me.

Trish

That’s such a random thing to say. But that’s how I feel.

Dr. Maz

What’s good is to look after your own grooming such as feeling almost reticent about saying I want to look good but after the way we look to where we feel it’s an important part of your sense of self like to get obsessed with it. But that applies to work to money to politics but little bit of grooming looking after yourself. Well, it restores a bit of living not always lifelike in ICU but you’re restoring a liquid living.

Trish

That’s so true and it’s really funny. Because if you feel like you look good you actually end up feeling good that’s how it is for me. I know that when I feel like I look like crap. I feel like crap. Whereas if I feel good, unconfident, I’m better at what I do. I’m small like other people. It’s just one of those things that when you look good for yourself it makes you feel better. But when you look good for other people you do it does give you a bit more sort of kudos or respect or whatever word you want to use for that like people like people that look good especially in this industry.

Dr. Maz

I think a lot of it’s as you said your confidence. Show people like you for not how pretty your hair is or how good your jawline is but for what you say what you think but for doing it for you you’re feeling and by doing that you’re getting more confidence and that rolls into how people see.

Trish

That’s so true. So you’ve been in this business for 20 years. I only found out just the other day. I think Botox has only been around or in Australia anyway. Botox only been around for what? 20 to 30 years.

Dr. Maz

It’s been around for about 30 years and Australia listed everything.

Trish

Because some I didn’t even know there was such a thing. Like now everybody knows about it but you can think 10 to 20 years ago not everybody knew that sort of thing was available. I just thought the movie stars looked good because they just looked that good. I didn’t realize they were having aesthetic treatments and using cosmetic medicine to make themselves look better was a real surprise to me.

Dr. Maz

Well, I always think it’s really fascinating. I like old movies. Sometimes I have a look at movies from the golden years of Hollywood, say about 30 to 40 years ago. And you see acting men, acting women, the leading men and leading women. They don’t look like they look like now. You look at Cary Grant and a movie and think it’s looking but all for the leading man. And you see how old he is. And it’s like 35 never roll 35. Nowadays, it’s not what it used to be.

Trish

That’s true.

Dr. Maz

But usually to have good looking people for Hollywood. But perspectives of good or normality even is to think in Hollywood over the last 20 to 10 years.

Trish

That’s true. So when you started an industry 20 years ago, how did you do it because at the moment like for people who want to get into the industry now there’s lots of training and all that sort of thing available to doctors, nurses, but I was there 30 years ago, like how did it start?

Dr. Maz

Well, I was quite lucky. I had quite a lot of surgical colleagues and I learned a lot from them. But even still in Australia there is just no formal governing body for cosmetic medicine. If you want to be a general surgeon or knee fitness there’s a college governmentally recognized there is no government recognized body officially. There’s a lot of semi formal bodies like the CPSA and the College of Surgeons are excellent pieces of training but it’s no regulatory governing body at least not yet.

Trish

Do you recognise that’s in the process of changing though?

Dr. Maz

They’ve been talking about having a change in the past since I’ve been a cosmetic doctor. But I also think there needs to be some accountability and a regulatory framework. So there’s a certain level of proficiency. And it’s also when people go and see that cosmetic surgeon or cosmetic physician they know that they’re being treated well to a certain at least basic level standard of care. Right now you could be a doctor who just finished medical school and doesn’t know which is the sharp end of a needle and call yourself a cosmetic doctor or it could be a nurse that officially needs to work underneath a doctor just out of nursing school do likewise.

Nicole

So going back to history I think cosmetics actually started in Egypt. I just googled it. Do you have any background on who or how initially fillers came about?

Dr. Maz

Well, look good. We have records dating back to Egypt even earlier. You often see paintings on the walls in Egyptian times hieroglyphics you see makeup around eyes they have an idea of what looks beautiful. You see statues of certain proportions, you often see the golden mean in those proportions. And we were seeking what looks beautiful. In but cosmetic surgery, cosmetic medicine, it really came to the fore the surgical part after World War Two where there’s a lot of horrific injuries, burns, and that’s really when face surgery. Got to start for fillers. Debbie news is a lot longer than people think that 100 years under the first filler was actually silicone, which is in some ways good because your body doesn’t react to it. But it’s bad long term. You use a filler because silicone by itself can spread into tissues too easily and it’s like glue. It’s very hard to get out like that chewing gum in here. And the word might look good in the beginning as it migrates but doesn’t look great at the end. But modern fillers really came about with early colleges and early Harnick acids about 30-40 years ago. I’m old enough to remember when we had collagen before we had good ha fillers, hyaluronic acid fillers, and what’s often called cold side plast or various different collagen analogues. And they were usually made from cow and he still has some dermal fillers around that are based on bovine collagen which is cow collagen. Often, you’d have to have a test beforehand on your forearm to make sure you’re allergic to it. And they were okay. But they weren’t ideal. There was a decent amount of allergies with them. And they often didn’t last long. About 25-30 years ago, we had the emergence of HA foods which are, I think, pretty much dominant now. There’s other fillers as well but most fillers are made from something called hyaluronic acid. Now, what’s hyaluronic acid? It’s a big essentially sugar molecule that we have naturally in our bodies is what makes skin full and plumpie. When we’re young we have lots of it. As we get older, it thins our skin becomes thinner, and of cosmetic medicine cosmetic injectables, you’re either replacing more that you’ve lost or putting some more structure in we never had much in the first place.

Nicole

It’s so interesting. I’m hearing that the 80’s was the boom 30 to 40 years ago. So I’m thinking that the 80’s is when cosmetic medicine got very exciting. Do people still have permanent fillers?

Dr. Maz

Yes, because even one that’s still TGA approved in Australia acclimated and has pros. The biggest pro well is your body cannot break it down but has a lot of cons. Your face changes, you could all be if you look at your own face five years ago, look at those Facebook photos, if face changes and fillers, even if they don’t migrate, and they always do they would move with it and become part of a problem and a future revenue solution. So fillers are an ideal you have potentially something that might look good for the first year but might become a problem forever after that. It has to be surgically removed. It’s difficult to remove.

Nicole

Now as a client, I’ll say Trish, would you decide between doing an energy based treatment or somebody to reverse signs of aging or injectables?

Dr. Maz

That’s a good question. And I think we can talk about other modalities as well. Even skincare, or Fred’s or mechanical means or liposuction means there’s no one over treatment. Otherwise, you’d go to your cosmetic doctor and only have one treatment for everything. There’s different things for different areas. For superficial areas for skin pigmentation, the dermal epidermal layer that’s where energy treatments usually are used. And why well, some of them are good for stimulating collagen, like the radio frequency devices. Some are good for pigment, like the Yag lasers, some are good for broken capillaries and veins and deeper structures. We might be wanting to relax the muscles. That’s what Botox or Dysport has 14 or we might want to go into the dish deeper tissue cleans and want to deal with creating structure. That’s what dermal fillers work well or it might be mechanical things sagging tissues, sagging cheeks, jawlines, or in a body, breasts, arms, that’s where surgery usually has a role. So they have a palette of different potential treatments and depending on what your anatomy is or it goes on you’d use just the right menu to fulfill what you need to do. Now I obviously want to be talking mainly about fillers and surgery but  since we’re talking about a secret history of cosmetic medicine if I may I can talk about the story of Botox which I think is a really fascinating and elaborate funny story. So Botox originally this is about 35 years ago now when you as a muscle relaxant it’ll block essentially stopped the release of acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that allows ministers to talk to each other. And by doing that people relaxed muscles. And we knew that it would stop muscles from contracting. So originally, it was used for muscle spasms, particularly spasms around eye muscles. ocular spasms. And there’s a story with an eye surgeon called Crothers in America. And he noticed that you’ll get excellent results to stop muscle spasms with a tiny dose of Botox. His wife was a dermatologist. And she changed. She noticed older patients always always want to come back for treatments even before this person comes back and they look good they would have much less crow’s feet much less cranky lines. And she thought there might be something to this. So some of the early reports from the Kauravas team discovered that Botox can be used for aesthetic reasons not just for medical reasons. And they still, to my knowledge, do lecture circuits talking about cosmetic medicine. So they were kind of the pioneers over a generation ago and that’s really started to become mainstream at that time.

Nicole

Trish, you’re muted. I can see your mouth moving.

Trish

Oops, God, I bet you people would love to be able to mute me whenever they wanted. But anyway. So correct me if I’m wrong. So I heard that Botox work came about because it used to be like it was a treatment for people with headaches. Do you know if that’s true?

Dr. Maz

I’m not sure if you heard much of my story. But it was used for muscle spasms.

Trish

Okay.

Dr. Maz

My muscles and husband-wife team are called Kravets. Just by sheer chance it was almost by accident like a lot of great adventures. So people notice that those patients treated for muscle spasms would look so much better the crow’s feet would disappear. And those patients would rock on up. Even if the muscle specimens are still good because they love the results of the cosmetic results.

Trish

Well, I know for a fact myself when I because I do suffer from headaches which is really ridiculous. Because when I have Botox done I don’t get headaches for a significant period of time. I think it’s a medical reason for me but anyway obviously it works for other things as well. And I know that you’re talking about spasms because I’ve heard of people having it for if they do have like they get Botox to kids for the third treatment. Do you know what that’s about?

Dr. Maz

Yes. Most people notice a cosmetic treatment but it’s still used a lot for medical reasons including muscle spasms. Kids for example, cerebral palsy, and we might be talking about like neonates, babies spasms in a foreign muscle that doesn’t allow them to have any use of that muscle. If you can relax in the right place they can now have some functional or given ability to walk again. And that’s kind of rewarding to see that it’s not just for vanity medicine. It’s used for some true medical things. You sometimes have spasms or arytenoid muscles, so people have trouble talking. It’s used a lot in teeth grinding, which if you don’t have it sounds like nothing but a grinding and masseter muscle but we have it’s terrible to wake up in pain you damage your teeth. And if you can remove that cause because you’re treating the cause of a problem. It’s one of the reasons you do medicine to be able to take away an illness.

Trish

Sorry, Nicole. Sorry. I didn’t mean to you go for it.

Nicole

No, you’re good. It was great. I am such a left fielder. But I’m looking at your website. And I don’t know if it’s the Pima or Darlinghurst clinic but it looks like you have the most incredible painting on your roof.

Trish

So I call high.

Dr. Maz

Usually out of date this lot of things we do which is not actually even on a website like we do some minor surgeries but we focused on medic medicine.

Nicole

Did you break your roof? 

Dr. Maz

Yes. It’s a beautiful old building. It used to be a stock bank almost 200 years ago with five meters ceilings and decided it had to do something with the roof so there’s these panels that we created just beautiful static pictures of them. Most people who have it because it’s five meters tall don’t even notice. It’s like I literally have patients easily. Oh, what’s it always?

Nicole

Incredible. Well, I was looking to see if you did buccal fat removal.

Dr. Maz

Buccal fat removal. Did you say you want to have buccal fat removal?

Nicole

Yes. I was looking on your side to say I want you if you do buckle but ever since Chrissy Takens had it done it’s become obviously very popular. Is that something that you do?

Dr. Maz

That’s usually a surgical procedure for Orisha for tomorrow like facial surgery. This by the way, what is it? Well, we have fat in a buccal area which is the cheek area. And if you have too much of it and look I have a full fat pouch base as well. I know what it’s like. But the advantage is it slim’s down the face and takes out a little bit of fullness there. There’s a downside to it. Part of the aging process we lose volume. And older you hate the fullness. Now when you’re young. strongly consider whether you should remove the fat because as you get older, you will find out. And it’s not always a good thing. As I say, that’s not always the enemy. It can go on to look hollow. And some people that had buckled fat removal day regretted often a year or two later because the face looks too thin or gone. And you often have to have dermal fillers to replace the volume loss. But yes, you can but have to refer to a surgical colleague.

Trish

And I wouldn’t recommend you do that. Nicole, why would you do that?

Nicole

What do you recommend to slim your face?

Dr. Maz

Well, that’s one of the options as we talked about before. There’s a whole palette of different potential treatments like in your face how to see you and his tiny little thumbnail but you can see him around his face. Great, beautiful cheekbones, nice jawline, if I was to do an assessment of you you’d have to have a look at Rector facing two thirds to top third, middle third loafers. You’d look at proportions to face shape and your case is quite oval. You’d look at the skin integrity and want to look at a bone structure beneath the cheekbones and chin and then determine what’s best. But short answer: what can we do to slim the face? I actually like cheekbones and I think that’s going to protect you and you’re going to like it particularly as you get older rather than someone who has finished features. Will you lose that? That nice fullness, that youthful fullness, but you want to make the face of things? Well, one of the clever Andrew if you look at your face your low food like me, Is it small, you got a strong mid face, strong upper face are quite small, low face. When clipping you can just use dermal fillers in the structure of the chin and elongate your low face. So now you know looking around looking more heart shape V shape and that I think will look awesome for you to the clinic in this tiny little thumbnail but from little bit. I think that’d be more important and just to surgically remove the factor. Other things you can do you can sometimes highlight the cheekbones but probably will say you wouldn’t need that because you already have nice cheekbones. Often as we get older our temples hollow out for what I can see your temples look good and sometimes we use dermal fillers to put structure there. If you are sagging, you can see a whole lot of jolliness today for sagging. Usually mechanical things were expressed as either a friend lift or a facelift for lifts I can do for surgical facelifts that refer to my surgical colleagues. So there’s no one easy answer.

Nicole

A facelift. Oh my gosh, that’s a bit scary.

Dr. Maz

Or different things. But your surgery for sagging is always the gold standard. I say.

Nicole

So much you’ve mentioned I think you’ve highlighted the importance of having a full face assessment rather than going into a clinic with a predetermined I’m gonna get my lips bigger today or this or that? How important is it to have an assessment with you?

Dr. Maz

I think that’s critical. Whether it’s myself or another colleague or my nurse colleagues, that’s the first important part you gotta have a plan before you do anything. Once you make an assessment, take a medical history. Doing it’s almost easy but you gotta have that plan beforehand. It’s not in for a haircut and you might know what you want. Well, that’s

Nicole

Well, that’s it. We don’t know all the options. So there may be tons of other options for the better outcome.

Dr. Maz

Absolutely. Patients that come in and say they might only know about wrinkles can improve them cranky lights to global areas. And you might not know you can improve that mold they’ve had the whole life or the bump in the nose that they were doing really don’t like which is maybe more important or might be opposite that people might come in and have big problems of skin integrity and avoid about a tiny wrinkle according to AI, and dolphins. But that’s not the most important thing. Ultimately, it’s a collaboration with you and your doctor or nurse. But it’s important to if you sometimes disagree with your patient, say Look I don’t think it’s an appropriate thing. Or they might ask for something, it’s totally inappropriate. They might be like someone who was at and wants to have very full lips. You have to have the right face around it to destructure rounded lips, otherwise it looks out of proportion and looks silly.

Trish

I think you’ve hit the nail on the head when you said if someone comes in the ad, and they want full lips it’s not going to work. And I think that’s why I’m like, I love full lips. But I love mom and the young girls I don’t like. I’m like myself at all. So that makes sense to me. But I was gonna ask you. So with the witch when cosmetic medicine first started to hit, what did you do? You just put a sign up saying I’m now doing cosmetic medicine. How did people even know about you? Because not everybody knew that there was such a thing as cosmetic surgery. Oh, did everybody know except me. Because I have no idea.

Dr. Maz

20 years ago, there were a couple places in Australia, but it wasn’t that well known. And I was lucky. I was working in an ICU at the time and had a lot of cosmetic and plastic surgeons I was working closely with and they taught me a few things. There’s some further studies. And yes, and I decided it’s something I love. I opened up first place on Harris Street and payment. And I loved the work. And my work was only very small. And I’ll still work in hospitals. But I knew this is what I love. And I’ll do this even as a hobby. And I was surprised 15 years ago when it actually became quite a big business and I had to give up my hospital work for it.

Trish

Yeah, cuz it’s some and it’s probably I reckon we’ve got the Kardashians to thank for that. Do you reckon? Come on because that’s about when they started coming out about 15 years ago.

Nicole

I think Pamela Anderson made a very big impact on Baywatch. Oh my goodness. I didn’t know about breast implants until February. I’ve said well.

Trish

I was told that I didn’t believe that Dolly Parton had fake boobs. I’m like, no way. They’re real. Like, I didn’t know that. You could even do that when I was younger. Of course I’ve wised up now. But I think people just didn’t even do well. The average person generally didn’t really know about injectables. So you say you put your sign up and the people will come which is a little bit different to these days. But so can we what did you offer? In those days? Like when you first started what was like if someone said, Okay, I want to look better, what would you offer them?

Dr. Maz

No, at that time the palette we talked about was much smaller. Botox and Dysport, which are there for wrinkle injections, muscle relaxants, and this is a very small range of dermal fillers. I love collagen because early collagen which didn’t last long felt hard. And it didn’t have anesthetics in it either. So if a viewer did cosmetic medicine 20 years ago you might want to have to do a new block when doing lips for example, nowadays, you really have to do a nerve block with this anesthetic built in. So you can still do some things but it’s quite limited. And we’re focused mostly on the lips and the nasal wavy lines. Nowadays, there’s multiple areas. Beauty is not just a lips, it’s a cheekbone, it’s the flow of the cheek to the curve. It’s the shape of the nose shape of your profile, the proportions and you can dress in almost all those areas.

Trish

What do you find that people are coming for more these days than they would have been before? Because lips have been getting their lips done for a long time have they? It’s not a new phenomenon.

Dr. Maz

No lifts were popular in fact, particularly popular I think in the early 2000’s. They were very popular then. I think people live more conservative nowadays.

Trish

Oh, that’s a real surprise to me. I hadn’t had any idea.

Dr. Maz

People always think that or that. Lips are a new thing. lips were one of the first areas that we use dermal fillers for because often you get quite a dramatic change sometimes not so much a great dramatic change but you always get a dramatic change.But it’s good to be sometimes it’s okay to be conservative. You don’t have to have the biggest lips in the world, you want to have the best lips for you.

Nicole

Have you noticed a change over the years in the amount of men who are having cosmetic procedures?

Dr. Maz

Oh, well, I’ve always been to the clinic and we always saw quite a lot of guys. I’ll say currently it’s slowly increasing. A good 30% of the patients I see are guys. So approaching 30% or more than 30% of approaching half or good looking people on a silver big screen is something that everybody does. Almost everybody. My patients are the people you’d least expect. I have truck drivers, politicians. Some of those blokey guys, you can imagine seeing. Essay soldiers include my patients actually and they often talk about to their friends and often see the whole platoon. Because these are guys that often are very body conscious, their body proud and they want to look after the way they look as well. So it almost makes sense that they want to look after aesthetics. It’s not just for the wealthy elite anymore. It’s for almost anybody that wants to look after the grooming.

Nicole

Wow, I cannot believe that. So many blokey blokes come in because I truly was thinking as soon as you said that he must be because he’s in Darlinghurst and Piedmont. I was thinking. No, that’s not the case at all. 

Dr. Maz

Probably imagining all this little metrosexual guys and look this summer flamboyant transvestite. So look after but the vast majority guys heterosexual guys, dads, brothers, guys that just want to look after the way to look. Or maybe older guys that are reentering the workforce and they feel they need to compete the way to look younger with young competitors. They’re working in the workforce. So it’s for anybody it’s part of their aesthetics really wants to look good.

Trish

And, so look at the beginning compared to now. Like when did lasers come out? Like because I know that like when I was 18, which is like 40 years ago. I can remember getting a laser to remove the hair on the back of my neck because I was very hairy. I’m not anymore, but I don’t know what happened. But my neck used to be really hairy and my and I had sideburns which is fine if you’re a bloke but if you’re a young girl it was pretty disturbing. So I went and had laser treatment then because this laser had just come out. So it’s 40 years ago and it removed my head so like I’ve only ever had that one session once and that was all I ever had. And that has all gone and never came back. I know I’m just I wish I knew what it was.

Dr. Maz

YAG laser but there’s not just one type of laser. There’s many different kinds. There’s ones that you go for hair removal like you’ve had and they’ve been around for a good 40 years and getting a little bit better now I think the gold standard would be maybe like Alexandrite lasers. Some are really good for pigmentation. Some are really good for resurfacing defects. So they’ve been around depending on the laser but 30-40 years and the technology is getting better and better.

Trish

What was the first laser that you got in your clinic?

Dr. Maz

It was an IPL laser. IPL intense pulsed light. It’s a good generalist, it’s a good workhorse for better skin and integrity, broken capillaries, redness and rosacea. It’s particularly good for.

Trish

Can you remove hair with that one?

Dr. Maz

You can and you still see some places advertising for that purpose. But I think there’s better lasers in the IPL if you’re just looking for hair removal.

Trish

That’s what I thought it was. I’ve heard someone that had it done with their IPL and like why would you use IPL but obviously because that’s not an older technology but older technology for hair removal. 

Dr. Maz

You can use it. But it’s like using a sledgehammer to open up wall notes. Work but there’s a better tool for it.

Trish

And what about in skincare like that? So we’ve been late. We’ve covered lasers. I’m a bit of an addict. What about in skincare? I guess that’s jumped in leaps and bounds. Because I used to use all of Ulan because what we all used? I don’t know how many years ago but maybe not even that long, maybe 20-30 years ago. I’m not sure.

Nicole

I put olive oil on my skin to get a tan. Which never worked.

Trish

I see his baby. It’s terrible.

Dr. Maz

Using butter that’s worse for 10 Don’t do it’s bad risky.

Trish

But so what about skincare? Has that changed in the last week? No, it has changed. But can you tell us a bit about the change from like 30 years ago to now in skincare because I don’t think it was retinol even around there. 

Dr. Maz

Retinol has been around for about 30 years now. And advise me analogs even longer. But skincare has changed before. It used to be just simple moisturizers with some branding. Nowadays, people often demand things which are more active and actually do something beyond just moisturizing your skin. So often you have things that have added peptides that improve the skin texture, integrity beyond what moisturizers can do. Some protection will become increasingly important. It’s not just to stop getting cancer but a big part of aging of your skin is total damage. So often a good skincare would have some forms of protection, and vitamin A’s. That may be a vitamin you think is kind of old school but vitamin A, we’re increasingly knowledgeable. It’s one of the few things you can rub on your skin topically that actually improves wrinkles. Most particularly the early skincare is barely worth a mark and goes into it. But vitamin A makes a difference. It has some downsides and a high dose can make your skin easily sensitive, red and flaking. If you’re using a high dose do not get pregnant on it. It’s bad one a few things we know are bad for pregnancy. And it makes you more sun sensitive. 

Trish

This vitamin A retinol?

Dr. Maz

Yes,.

Trish

I hate to ask that question, but I’m sure it’s retinol. 

Dr. Maz

There’s a few different kinds of rich retinoic acid Trezor, retinol and retinol eights. But all of them are based on vitamin A. And vitamin A is really important for skin cell turnover and what it does to your skin it actually makes the lines better.

Nicole

Wow. So Dr. Maz before we wrap up can you tell us your number one tip from all of your your wealth of knowledge and years of experience for men and women to prevent the signs of aging what would you recommend is our must do

Dr. Maz

Just one thing have a that applies to most things in life have a plan don’t just haphazardly pick things because you saw on a shelf or friend recommends it have a plan and stick to it as if just one part of the plan I would recommend some protection if there’s one thing can do for your skin that’s relatively expensive that your body will thank you for they’ll make you look good and might even save your life some protection

Trisg

Such a good point because you’re so right there because like and it’s only been the last or for me I’ve only started wearing sunblock probably since I’ve been in this industry because everyone used to bang on about it so much. And now I wear of course every day but that’s only been like nine years or so but the importance of wearing sunblock and keeping that protection I reckon that that’s a great balance only point and and exactly like what you said I think have a plan but I also for myself I think is one of the one of the really important thing is to find yourself a practitioner a clinic and actually  create the plan with them and actually don’t go here and there and have this one here and be random and have this Sunday which is exactly what I’ve been known to do. But actually go somewhere and have that plan and actually work with that you know organization to create your plan to make it look good.

Dr. Maz

Obviously you will have so much trust. If you are doing your bookkeeping, your accountancy, you don’t go to many different accountants and introduce their taxi driver and talk to your barista. You have one person you find that you trust and you have your financial plan for that person. What is your face, your skin that’s arguably even more important. Have someone you trust that you can talk about it with. That’s not just because they want to sell you something that also applies to your accountant. But it’s someone that genuinely wants to listen to you and wants to know what your goals are and wants to give you the best tools to reach those goals. So finding that first person I think could help make those plans really important.

Nicole

Thank you so much, Dr. Maz. This has been amazing. And I can’t wait until I come in and lay on your floor and look at the ceiling.

Dr. Maz

Okay, you have high expectations for that ceiling and make sure the ceiling matches those expectations. As well, even it’s virtually and I hope some of that was both informative but equally importantly interesting as well.

Trish

That’s been great. Look, I gotta say, before we actually finish up I gotta say, when I first started this injury industry which was 2013 You were actually the first person that I actually heard speak at a conference and so I’ve actually been following you for the whole lot of years since I’ve been in the industry. So it’s been really good doing this with you today especially because it’s about the history or looking at the history anyway then we got a bit carried away but anyways covered a bit of the history. Of course, I beg your pardon.

Dr. Maz

Conference was that?

Trish

I think it was. A cause maybe just wasn’t the checks. Yes, that’s the one because the text I can’t remember it was in Sydney though. It was massive. Like there were lots of different rooms, but you’d always stuck out for me because I can’t remember why. But you were the one that I came to listen to. But yeah, you were the first person I ever heard speak at a conference. So I’ve always been like, wow, that’s interesting.

Dr. Maz

Okay, thank you.

Trish

A pleasure look. So thank you so much for taking the time to speak with us today.

Dr. Maz

My pleasure. Lovely.

 

Trish

And this is if you do want to find out some more if you want to go see Dr Maz, you can actually find him at Star cosmetic medicine. So you can just look it up but it’s basically a pretty easy sarcoid star cosmetic medicine dot Sydney so very easy to find. Go there and Dr. Maz or and his team will help you out. They’re doing great work there. So thank you so much for joining us today Dr. Maz.

Dr. Maz

My pleasure Trish. 

Dr. Maz

Thank you. Hi, my name is Dr Maz, I’m here today with Trish Hammond in Aesthetics Uncensored talking about Aesthetics Uncensored. Everything that you want to know about Cosmetic Medicine, injectables and even the surgery from the perspective of someone that works in his field everyday

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Well, like all good quickies it's time to dust off and get back to our day jobs! If you liked the podcast please rate us because we need the validation for our fragile hearts. If you have a story to share or have a burning question you would like us to cover please slide into our DM’s on Instagram at @transformingbodiespodcast. Stay positive, keep your boobs and chins high until we chat again xoxo Trish